Post-Modernism, Economics and Knowledge

Edited by Jack Amariglio, Stephen E Cullenberg, David F Ruccio

© 2001 – Routledge

512 pages

Purchasing Options:
Paperback: 9780415110266
pub: 2001-05-16
US Dollars$83.95
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Hardback: 9780415110259
pub: 2001-05-16
US Dollars$240.00
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e–Inspection Copy

About the Book

Only in the past twenty years have debates surrounding modernism and postmodernism begun to have an impact on economics. This new way of thinking rejects claims that science and mathematics provide the only models for the structure of economic knowledge.

This ground-breaking volume brings together the essays of top theorists including Arjo Klamer, Deirdre McCloskey, Julie Nelson, Shaun Hargreaves-Heap and Philip Mirowski on a diverse range of topics such as gender, postcolonial theory and rationality as well as postmodernism.

About the Editors

Stephen Cullenberg is Chair of the Department of Economics at the University of California, Riverside. Jack Amariglio is Professor of Economics at Merrimack College. David F. Ruccion is Associate Professor of Economics at the University of Notre Dame.

About the Series

Economics as Social Theory

Social Theory is experiencing something of a revival within economics. Critical analyses of the particular nature of the subject matter of social studies and of the types of method, categories and modes of explanation that can legitimately be endorsed for the scientific study of social objects, are re-emerging. Economists are again addressing such issues as the relationship between agency and structure, between economy and the rest of society, and between the enquirer and the object of enquiry. There is a renewed interest in elaborating basic categories such as causation, competition, culture, discrimination, evolution, money, need, order, organization, power probability, process, rationality, technology, time, truth, uncertainty, value etc.

The objective for this series is to facilitate this revival further. In contemporary economics the label “theory” has been appropriated by a group that confines itself to largely asocial, ahistorical, mathematical “modelling”. Economics as Social Theory thus reclaims the “Theory” label, offering a platform for alternative rigorous, but broader and more critical conceptions of theorizing.

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Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
BUS000000
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS / General
BUS023000
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS / Economic History