Human Knowledge: Its Scope and Limits

By Bertrand Russell

© 2009 – Routledge

464 pages

Purchasing Options:
Paperback: 9780415474443
pub: 2009-02-17
US Dollars$31.95
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About the Book

How do we know what we "know"? How did we –as individuals and as a society – come to accept certain knowledge as fact? In Human Knowledge, Bertrand Russell questions the reliability of our assumptions on knowledge. This brilliant and controversial work investigates the relationship between ‘individual’ and ‘scientific’ knowledge. First published in 1948, this provocative work contributed significantly to an explosive intellectual discourse that continues to this day.

Reviews

‘The nearest thing to a systematic philosophy written by one who does not believe in systems of philosophy. Its scope is encyclopedic…a joy to read.’ – New York Times

‘His intelligibility comes of stating things directly as he himself seems them, sharply defined and readily crystallized in the best English philosophical style.’ - The Times Literary Supplement

About the Author

Bertrand Russell (1872-1970). The leading British Philosopher of the twentieth century, who made major contributions to the area of logic and epistemology. Politically active and habitually outspoken, his ethical principles twice lead to imprisonment

About the Series

Routledge Classics

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Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
PHI000000
PHILOSOPHY / General
PHI004000
PHILOSOPHY / Epistemology
PHI011000
PHILOSOPHY / Logic
PHI016000
PHILOSOPHY / History & Surveys / Modern