Personality Assessment in the DSM-5

Edited by Steven K. Huprich, Christopher J. Hopwood

© 2013 – Routledge

140 pages

Purchasing Options:
Hardback: 9780415634533
pub: 2013-03-11
US Dollars$160.00
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About the Book

The DSM-5 promises to be a major reformulation of psychopathology, and no section is likely to change diagnostic practice more than that of personality pathology. Unlike the DSM-IV, the DSM-5 personality disorders will be conceptualized as involving core deficits in interpersonal and self-functioning, and will utilize a hybrid assessment model involving both pathological trait dimensions and a limited set of personality disorder types. These changes are based on empirical and theoretical work conducted during the era of DSM-III/IV, but nevertheless there is significant disagreement among personality assessors regarding the DSM-5 proposal. In this volume, several members of the DSM-5 work group offer rationales for the proposal and offer empirical evidence regarding suggested changes, and several personality assessment researchers critique the proposal and offer alternative conceptualizations.

This book was originally published as a special issue of the Journal of Personality Assessment.

Table of Contents

1. Introduction 2. Personality in DSM-5: Helping Delineate Personality Disorder Content and Framing the Metastructure 3. Toward a Model for Assessing Level of Personality Functioning in DSM-5, Part I: A Review of Theory and Methods 4. Toward a Model for Assessing Level of Personality Functioning in DSM-5, Part II: Empirical Articulation of a Core Dimension of Personality Pathology 5. Contributions from Personality- and Psychodynamically Oriented Assessment to the Development of the DSM-5 Personality Disorders 6. Toward a Multidimensional Model of Personality Disorder Diagnosis: Implications for DSM-5 7. Qualitative and Quantitative Distinctions in Personality Disorder 8. Computerized Adaptive Assessment of Personality Disorder: Introducing the CAT-PD Project 9. Assessing Personality in the DSM-5: The Utility of Bipolar Constructs10. Personality Traits in the DSM-5

About the Editors

Steven K. Huprich, Ph.D, is a Professor of Psychology at Eastern Michigan University, USA. He is an Associate Editor for the Journal of Personality Disorders and studies the assessment and classification of personality disorders.

Christopher J. Hopwood, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychology at Michigan State University, USA. He is an Associate Editor for the Journal of Personality Disorders whose research and clinical practice focus on the assessment and treatment of personality pathology.

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