Rehabilitation of Visual Disorders After Brain Injury

2nd Edition

By Josef Zihl

© 2010 – Psychology Press

288 pages | 59 B/W Illus.

Purchasing Options:
New in Paperback: 9780415651431
pub: 2013-09-12
US Dollars$54.95
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Hardback: 9781848720060
pub: 2010-10-28
US Dollars$110.00
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e–Inspection Copy

About the Book

This thoroughly updated and extended edition covers the various cerebral visual disorders acquired after brain injury, as well as the rehabilitation techniques used to treat them. These are described within a brain plasticity framework, using data from single and group case studies along with follow up observation data. This original, tailor-made approach also includes the recording of eye movements for assessing scanning performance in scene perception and reading.

The book gives a brief synopsis of the historical background on the subject, alongside an outline of intervention designs and methodological difficulties in the field, and goes on to discuss the mechanisms and processes that provide the foundations for recovery of function and successful adaptation in visually impaired patients. The author concludes by analyzing the importance of the procedures and outcomes of treatments to the reduction of patients’ visual handicaps.

The new edition also contains an appendix with recommendations on the case histories, diagnostics and treatments. It is ideal reading for students in clinical neuropsychology, as well as professionals in the fields of neurology, visual neuroscience and rehabilitation experts.

Reviews

"The great thing about this book is Professor Zihl’s ability to integrate a strong cognitive neuroscience approach to understanding normal and pathological visual perception with a pragmatic, sensitive and sensible approach to helping people with visual disorders after brain injury. I thought the first edition of this book was excellent. The second is even better." - Jonathan Evans, Professor of Applied Neuropsychology, University of Glasgow, UK

Table of Contents

1. Introduction. 2. The Visual Brain. 3. Visual Field Disorders. 4. Visual Acuity, Spatial Contrast Sensitivity and Visual Adaptation. 5. Colour Vision. 6. Visual Space Perception. 7. Visual Agnosia. 8. Central Scotoma. References. Appendix.

About the Author

Josef Zihl is Professor of Neuropsychology at the University of Munich, and Head of the Research group Neuropsychology at the Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry in Munich, Germany.

About the Series

Neuropsychological Rehabilitation: A Modular Handbook

Rehabilitation is a process whereby people, who have been injured by injury or illness, work together with health service staff and others to achieve their optimum level of physical, psychological, social and vocational well-being (McLellan, 1991). It includes all measures aimed at reducing the impact of handicapping and disabling conditions and at enabling disabled people to return to their most appropriate environment (WHO, 1986; Wilson, 1997). It also includes attempts to alter impairment in underlying cognitive and brain systems by the provision of systematic, planned experience to the damaged brain (Robertson & Murre, 1999). The above views apply also to neuropsychological rehabilitation, which is concerned with the assessment, treatment and natural recovery of people who have sustained an insult to the brain.

Neuropsychological rehabilitation is influenced by a number of fields both from within and without psychology. Neuropsychology, behavioural psychology and cognitive psychology have each played important roles in the development of current rehabilitation practice. So too have findings from studies of neuroplasticity, linguistics, geriatric medicine, neurology and other fields. Our discipline, therefore, is not confined to one conceptual framework; rather, it has a broad theoretical base.

We hope that this broad base is reflected in the modular handbook. The first book was by Roger Barker and Stephen Dunnett which set the scene by talking about "Neural repair, transplantation and rehabilitation". The second title, by Josef Zihl, addressed visual disorders after brain injury. The most recent book by Barbara Wilson, Camilla Herbert and Agnes Shiel focussed on behavioural approaches to rehabilitation. Future titles will include volumes on specific cognitive functions such as language, memory and motor skills, together with social and personality aspects of neuropsychological rehabilitation. Other titles will follow as this is the kind of handbook that can be added to over the years.

Although each volume will be based on a strong theoretical foundation relevant to the topic in question, the main thrust of a majority of the books will be the development of practical, clinical methods of rehabilitation arising out of this research enterprise.

The series is aimed at neuropsychologists, clinical psychologists and other rehabilitation specialists such as occupational therapists, speech and language pathologists, rehabilitation physicians and other disciplines involved in the rehabilitation of people with brain injury.

Neuropsychological rehabilitation is at an exciting stage in its development. On the one hand, we have a huge growth of interest in functional imaging techniques to tell us about the basic processes going on in the brain. On the other hand, the past few years have seen the introduction of a number of theoretically driven approaches to cognitive rehabilitation from the fields of language, memory, attention and perception. In addition to both the above, there is a growing recognition from health services that rehabilitation is an integral part of a health care system. Of course, alongside the recognition of the need for rehabilitation is the view that any system has to be evaluated. To those of us working with brain injured people including those with dementia, there is a feeling that things are moving forward. This series, we hope, is one reflection of this move and the integration of theory and practice.

REFERENCES

  • McLellan, D. L. (1991). Functional recovery and the principles of disability medicine. In M. Swash & J. Oxbury (Eds.), Clinical neurology. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone.
  • Robertson, I.H., & Murre, J.M.J. (1999). Rehabilitation of brain damage: Brain plasticity and principles of guided recovery. Psychological Bulletin, 125, 544–575.
  • Wilson, B.A. (1997). Cognitive rehabilitation: How it is and how it might be. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 3, 487-496.
  • World Health Organisation (1986). Optimum care of disabled people. Report of a WHO meeting, Turku, Finland.

Barbara A. Wilson

Ian H. Robertson

Learn more…

Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
PSY000000
PSYCHOLOGY / General
PSY020000
PSYCHOLOGY / Neuropsychology