Slavery, Southern Culture, and Education in Little Dixie, Missouri, 1820-1860

By Jeffrey C. Stone

© 2006 – Routledge

120 pages | 1 B/W Illus.

Purchasing Options:
Paperback: 9780415654203
pub: 2012-09-09
US Dollars$48.95
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Hardback: 9780415977722
pub: 2006-01-26
US Dollars$135.00
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e–Inspection Copy

About the Book

This dissertation examines the cultural and educational history of central Missouri between 1820 and 1860, and in particular, the issue of master-slave relationships and how they affected education (broadly defined as the transmission of Southern culture). Although Missouri had one of the lowest slave populations during the Antebellum period, Central Missouri - or what became known as Little Dixie - had slave percentages that rivaled many regions and counties of the Deep South. However, slaves and slave owners interacted on a regular basis, which affected cultural transmission in the areas of religion, work, and community. Generally, slave owners in Little Dixie showed a pattern of paternalism in all these areas, but the slaves did not always accept their masters' paternalism, and attempted to forge a life of their own.

Reviews

"Stone's study of life on the peripheries of slavery -- both literally and figuratively -- enhances our understanding of slavery in the American South."

-History of Education Quarterly

Table of Contents

Introduction. 1. This Place Called Little Dixie 2. Home and Community 3. Religion 4. Slaves and Families 5. Summary and Conclusion

About the Author

Jeffrey C. Stone is the Regional Dean for the Louisville, KY Campus, Indiana Wesleyan University.

About the Series

Studies in African American History and Culture

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Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
HIS036000
HISTORY / United States / General
HIS036050
HISTORY / United States / Civil War Period (1850-1877)
SOC001000
SOCIAL SCIENCE / Ethnic Studies / African American Studies