Phenomenology and the Social World

The Philosophy of Merleau-Ponty and its Relation to the Social Sciences

By Laurie Spurling

© 1977 – Routledge

224 pages

Purchasing Options:
Hardback: 9780415703178
pub: 2013-08-08
US Dollars$120.00

About the Book

The term ‘phenomenology’ has become almost as over-used and emptied of meaning as that other word from Continental Philosophy, namely ‘existentialism’. Yet Husserl, who first put forward the phenomenological method, considered it a rigorous alternative to positivism, and in the hands of Merleau-Ponty, a disciple of Husserl in France, phenomenology became a way of gaining a disciplined and coherent perspective on the world in which we live.

When this study originally published in 1977 there were only a few books in English on Merleau-Ponty’s philosophy. It introduced the reader and suggested how his thought might throw light on some of the assumptions and presuppositions of certain contemporary forms of Anglo-Saxon philosophy and social science. It also demonstrates how phenomenology seeks to unite philosophy and social science, rather than define them as mutually exclusive domains of knowledge.

Table of Contents

Preface Introduction 1. The Programme of Existential Phenomenology 2. Speech 3. Society 4. Marxism 5. Ethics 6. Philosophy 7. Conclusion

About the Series

Routledge Library Editions: Phenomenology

Reissuing works originally published between 1959 and 1995, Routledge Library Editions: Phenomenology offers a selection of scholarship covering this important branch of philosophy. Volumes cover theories of Husserl and Heidegger, and branch out to such topics as psychology, Marxism, language and emotion, and education, forming a varied and informative collection of previously out-of-print works.

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Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
PHILOSOPHY / Movements / Phenomenology
SOCIAL SCIENCE / Sociology / General