By Cory Juhl, Eric Loomis

© 2010 – Routledge

320 pages

Purchasing Options:
Paperback: 9780415773331
pub: 2009-08-07
US Dollars$41.95
Hardback: 9780415773324
pub: 2009-08-10
US Dollars$210.00

e–Inspection Copy

About the Book

Analyticity, or the 'analytic/synthetic' distinction is one of the most important and controversial problems in contemporary philosophy. It is also essential to understanding many developments in logic, philosophy of language, epistemology and metaphysics. In this outstanding introduction to analyticity Cory Juhl and Eric Loomis cover the following key topics:

  • The origins of analyticity in the philosophy of Hume and Kant
  • Carnap's arguments concerning analyticity in the early twentieth century
  • Quine's famous objections to analyticity in his classic 'Two Dogmas of Empiricism' essay
  • The relationship between analyticity and central issues in metaphysics, such as ontology
  • The relationship between analyticity and epistemology
  • Analyticity in the context of the current debates in philosophy, including mathematics and ontology

Throughout the book the authors show how many philosophical controversies hinge on the problem of analyticity. Additional features include chapter summaries, annotated further reading and a glossary of technical terms making the book ideal to those coming to the problem for the first time.


'Juhl and Loomis have provided an interesting and engaging introduction to the problem of distinguishing analytic from synthetic sentences. They do an admirable job of explaining the importance of this distinction by tracing its history from Hume to Kant to the logical positivists and, in the last few chapters, to debates which are at the center of contemporary analytic philosophy.' – Jeff Speaks, University of Notre Dame, USA

'This is a great book, and certainly the best introduction to the history of analytic/synthetic distinction out there. Juhl and Loomis trace the distinction through the work of Kant, Bolzano and Frege, before paying special attention the development of Quine and Carnap's views, and presenting and defending their own account of analyticity.' - Gillian Russell, Washington University, St Louis, USA

Table of Contents

Introduction 1. Conceptions of analytic truth 2. Carnap and Quine 3. Analyticity and its discontents 4. Analyticity and ontology 5. Analyticity and epistemology 6. Analyticity repositioned Glossary Notes Bibliography Index

About the Series

New Problems of Philosophy

New Problems of Philosophy

Series Editor: José Luis Bermúdez, Texas A&M University

'Routledge's New Problems of Philosophy series has a most impressive line-up of topical volumes aimed at upper-level undergraduate and graduate students in philosophy and at others with interests in cutting edge philosophical work. The authors are influential figures in their respective fields and notably adept at synthesizing and explaining intricate topics fairly and comprehensively.' – John Heil, Monash University (Australia) and Washington University, St Louis (USA)

‘This is an outstanding collection of volumes. The topics are well chosen and the authors are outstanding. They will be fine texts in a wide range of courses.’ - Stephen Stich, Rutgers University, USA

The New Problems of Philosophy series provides accessible and engaging surveys of the most important problems in contemporary philosophy. Each book examines a topic or theme that has emerged on the philosophical landscape in recent years, or that is a longstanding problem refreshed in light of recent work in philosophy and related disciplines. Clearly explaining the nature of the problem at hand and assessing attempts to answer it, books in the series are excellent starting-points for undergraduate and graduate students wishing to study a single topic in depth. They will also be essential reading for professional philosophers. Additional features include chapter summaries, further reading, and a glossary of technical terms.

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Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
PHILOSOPHY / Epistemology
PHILOSOPHY / Metaphysics