Corporate Power and Globalization in US Foreign Policy

Edited by Ronald W. Cox

© 2010 – Routledge

216 pages | 2 B/W Illus.

Purchasing Options:
Paperback: 9780415746335
pub: 2013-11-11
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Hardback: 9780415781961
pub: 2012-03-16
US Dollars$145.00

About the Book

More than a decade into the new millennium, the fusion of corporate and state power is the essential defining feature of US foreign policy. This edited volume critically examines the relationship between corporations and the US state in the development of foreign policies related to globalization.

Drawing together a wide range of contributors, this work explores the role of corporations in using US foreign policies to advance the interests of transnational capital in a wide range of contexts, including:

  • how US government policies have contributed to the globalization of production and finance
  • the ways in which transnational corporations have influenced the US relationship with China, a crucial linkage in the new era of transnational accumulation
  • how transnational corporate power has shaped capital-labour relations, humanitarian intervention, structural adjustment policies, low-intensity democracy and the G20 summits
  • the "corporate centrism" of the Obama Administration, whose policies have been consistent with the growing power of transnational capital in US foreign policymaking
  • the politics and consequences of the embedded relationship between various sectors of the transnational capitalist class, global institutions and the US state, including the limits and contradictions of this relationship during the ongoing capitalist crisis.

This work will be of great interest to students and scholars of both US foreign policy and international political economy.

Table of Contents

Introduction: Corporate Power and the Threat to Democracy Ronald W Cox 1. Corporate Finance and US Foreign Policy Ronald W. Cox 2. Transnational Capital and the US-China Nexus Ronald W. Cox and Sylvan Lee 3. The International Labor Solidarity Center in the Global Economy Ronald W. Cox and G. Nelson Bass 4. The Corporate Centrism of the Obama Administration Daniel Skidmore-Hess 5. The Military-Industrial Complex in a Globalized Context David Gibbs 6. Financialization, Corporate Powers and South African Subimperialism Patrick Bond 7. The Political Economy of Low-Intensity Democracy William Aviles 8. Class Power, Neoliberalism and the G20 Summits Susanne Soederberg Conclusion: What Now? Implications of the Long Turn to the Right Ronald W. Cox and Dan Skidmore-Hess

About the Editor

Ronald W. Cox is Associate Professor in the Department of Politics and International Relations, Florida International University,USA. He has written extensively in the areas of international political economy, US foreign policy, and the political economy of baseball.

About the Series

Routledge Studies in US Foreign Policy

This new series sets out to publish high quality works by leading and emerging scholars critically engaging with United States Foreign Policy. The series welcomes a variety of approaches to the subject and draws on scholarship from international relations, security studies, international political economy, foreign policy analysis and contemporary international history.

Subjects covered include the role of administrations and institutions, the media, think tanks, ideologues and intellectuals, elites, transnational corporations, public opinion, and pressure groups in shaping foreign policy, US relations with individual nations, with global regions and global institutions and America’s evolving strategic and military policies.

The series aims to provide a range of books – from individual research monographs and edited collections to textbooks and supplemental reading for scholars, researchers, policy analysts, and students.

Learn more…

Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
POLITICAL SCIENCE / International Relations / General