Education, Experience and Existence

Engaging Dewey, Peirce and Heidegger

By John Quay

© 2013 – Routledge

224 pages

Purchasing Options:
Paperback: 9781138941281
pub: 2015-08-20
Available for pre-order
US Dollars$53.95
x
Hardback: 9780415825856
pub: 2013-05-20
US Dollars$145.00
x

Look Inside

About the Book

Education, Experience and Existence proposes a new way of understanding education that delves beneath the conflict, confusion and compromise that characterize its long history. At the heart of this new understanding is what John Dewey strove to expound: a coherent theory of experience. Dewey’s reputation as a pragmatist is well known, but where experience is concerned pragmatism is only half the story. The other half is phenomenological, as crafted by Martin Heidegger. Encompassing both is Charles Sanders Peirce, whose philosophy draws pragmatism and phenomenology together in an embrace which enables a truly experiential philosophy to emerge.

The book approaches the problem of confusion in education and philosophy by beginning with our most basic understandings of existence. Existence as an interaction is the starting point of modern science, and existence as individuality offers an aesthetic origin, attending to existence as a simple unity. In our contemporary world where scientific ways of thinking are privileged, the aesthetic whole is often overlooked, especially in education. Yet both are connected. A coherent theory of experience is therefore a marriage between phenomenology and pragmatism, enabling each to maintain its position by acknowledging how both are required.

The book is divided into three main parts:

- confusion in philosophy and education

- a coherent theory of experience

- a coherent theory of education.

Quay suggests that education benefits from such a coherent theory of experience by better comprehending its connection to life. More than just knowing, more than just doing, education is about being. This book will be of interest to philosophers, educators and educational philosophers.

Table of Contents

Part I: Confusion in Philosophy and Education Education, Philosophy and Existence Part II: A Coherent Theory of Experience Reflective Experience and the Logical Difference. The Challenge of Non-reflective (Aesthetic) Experience. The Ontological Difference. The Way of Phenomenology. Heidegger's Questioning of Be-ing Part III: A Coherent Theory of Education Four Causes of Educational Confusion. Educating Through Occupations as Ways of Be-ing.

About the Author

John Quay is Senior Lecturer at the Graduate School of Education, University of Melbourne, Australia.

About the Series

New Directions in the Philosophy of Education

This book series is devoted to the exploration of new directions in the philosophy of education. After the linguistic turn, the cultural turn, and the historical turn, where might we go? Does the future promise a digital turn with a greater return to connectionism, biology and biopolitics based on new understandings of system theory and knowledge ecologies? Does it foreshadow a genuinely alternative radical global turn based on a new openness and interconnectedness? Does it leave humanism behind or will it reengage with the question of the human in new and unprecedented ways? How should philosophy of education reflect new forces of globalization? How can it become less Anglo-centric and develop a greater sensitivity to other traditions, languages, and forms of thinking and writing, including those that are not routed in the canon of Western philosophy but in other traditions that share the ‘love of wisdom’ that characterizes the wide diversity within Western philosophy itself. Can this be done through a turn to intercultural philosophy? To indigenous forms of philosophy and philosophizing? Does it need a post-Wittgensteinian philosophy of education? A postpostmodern philosophy? Or should it perhaps leave the whole construction of 'post'-positions behind?

In addition to the question of the intellectual resources for the future of philosophy of education, what are the issues and concerns that philosophers of education should engage with? How should they position themselves? What is their specific contribution? What kind of intellectual and strategic alliances should they pursue? Should philosophy of education become more global, and if so, what would the shape of that be? Should it become more cosmopolitan or perhaps more decentred? Perhaps most importantly in the digital age, the time of the global knowledge economy that reprofiles education as privatized human capital and simultaneously in terms of an historic openness, is there a philosophy of education that grows out of education itself, out of the concerns for new forms of teaching, studying, learning and speaking that can provide comment on ethical and epistemological configurations of economics and politics of knowledge? Can and should this imply a reconnection with questions of democracy and justice?

This series comprises texts that explore, identify and articulate new directions in the philosophy of education. It aims to build bridges, both geographically and temporally: bridges across different traditions and practices and bridges towards a different future for philosophy of education.

Learn more…

Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
EDU000000
EDUCATION / General
EDU040000
EDUCATION / Philosophy & Social Aspects
PHI034000
PHILOSOPHY / Social