Durkheim, Bernard and Epistemology

By Paul Q. Hirst

© 2011 – Routledge

216 pages

Purchasing Options:
Paperback: 9780415847148
pub: 2013-02-28
US Dollars$48.95
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Hardback: 9780415563499
pub: 2010-10-14
US Dollars$125.00
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e–Inspection Copy

About the Book

This title, first published in 1975, contains two complimentary studies by Paul Q. Hirst: the first based on Claude Bernard’s theory of scientific knowledge, and the second concerning Emile Durkheim’s attempt to provide a philosophical foundation for a scientific sociology in The Rules of Sociological Method. The author’s primary concern is to answer the question: is Durkheim’s theory of knowledge logically consistent and philosophically viable? His principal conclusion is that the epistemology developed in the Rules is an impossible one and that its inherent contradictions are proof that sociology as it is commonly understood can never be a scientific discipline.

Table of Contents

Part 1: Claude Bernard 1. Claude Bernard’s Epistemology 2. Bernard’s Physiology Part 2: Emile Durkheim’s Rules of Sociological Method 3. Durkheim’s Epistemology 4. Pathology and Morphology 5. Individualism and Holism: Purpose, Functionalism and Social Facts 6. Individualism and Holism: Vitalism and the Social Milieu 7. Conclusion: The Rules of Sociological Method and Durkheim’s Sociology

About the Series

Routledge Library Editions: Emile Durkheim

This four volume set is dedicated to the work of Emile Durkheim, one of the most important and prolific sociologists in the field, who is commonly cited as a founding father of modern social science.

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Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
PHI004000
PHILOSOPHY / Epistemology
SOC026000
SOCIAL SCIENCE / Sociology / General