Spatial Regulation in New York City

From Urban Renewal to Zero Tolerance

By Themis Chronopoulos

© 2011 – Routledge

234 pages | 20 B/W Illus.

Purchasing Options:
Paperback: 9780415850797
pub: 2013-05-23
US Dollars$54.95
Hardback: 9780415891585
pub: 2011-02-07
US Dollars$150.00

About the Book

This book explores and critiques the process of spatial regulation in post-war New York, focusing on the period after the fiscal crisis of the 1970s, examining the ideological underpinnings and practical applications of urban renewal, exclusionary zoning, anti-vagrancy laws, and order-maintenance policing. It argues that these practices were part of a class project that deflected attention from the underlying causes of poverty, eroded civil rights, and sought to enable real estate investment, high-end consumption, mainstream tourism, and corporate success.

Table of Contents

Introduction 1.The Betrayal of the Liberal Assumptions of Urban Renewal 2. The Failure of Urban Renewal as a Spatial Ordering Apparatus 3. Times Square: New York’s Most Disorderly Place 4. Neoliberalism, Neoconservatism, and Spatial Regulation 5. Graffiti as a Manifestation of Social Disorder 6. The Declining Appearance of Order, 1978-1993 7. The Radicalization of Spatial Regulation, 1994-2001. Epilogue: The Legacy of Displacement and Exclusion

About the Author

Themis Chronopoulos is Assistant Professor of History at the State University of New York, Stony Brook.

About the Series

Routledge Advances in Geography

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Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
POLITICAL SCIENCE / Public Policy / Regional Planning
SOCIAL SCIENCE / Human Geography
SOCIAL SCIENCE / Sociology / Urban