Religion and Teaching

By Ronald D. Anderson

© 2008 – Routledge

136 pages

Purchasing Options:
Paperback: 9780805851625
pub: 2007-08-14
US Dollars$45.95
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e–Inspection Copy

About the Book

This text engages preservice and practicing teachers in considering some of the complex issues related to religion and teaching that all educators face in their interactions with students, parents, administrators, and fellow teachers. The questions are not just about what is legal and what is not, but how a teacher should act in the best interests of all students, both those who are religious and those who are not.

This book does not provide answers. Its goal is to cause readers to reflect deeply on issues related to their professional decisions and actions regarding religion and teaching.

Religion and Teaching is pertinent for all prospective and practicing teachers at any stage in their teaching careers. It can be used in any undergraduate or graduate course that addresses issues of religion and teaching.

Reviews

"These reviewers recommend the text for courses in teacher education or educational administration, as it will benefit the preservice or practicing teacher who wants to understand more deeply the place of religion in public education and the diverse positions that make up the current conversation."--Brandon Sams, Educational Studies (2009), 45:6, 589-591

Table of Contents

Contents: Series Preface. Preface. Part I: Case Studies and Reactions.

Introduction to Case 1. Case 1: "What Is Religious?" Reader Reactions to Jed and Kathy’s Disagreement. Reactions to "What Is Religious?" Reader Reactions to "What Is Religious?" Summary and Additional Questions. Introduction to Case 2. Case 2: "What Does It Mean to 'Teach' Something?" Reader Reactions to the Instructional Dispute. Reactions to "What Does It Mean to 'Teach' Something?" Reader Reactions to "What Does It Mean to 'Teach' Something?" Summary and Additional Questions. Introduction to Case 3. Case 3: "How Can Religion Be Public in a Pluralistic Society?" Reader Reactions to Public Expression of Religious Ideas. Reactions to "How Can Religion Be Public in a Pluralistic Society?" Reader Reactions to "How Can Religion Be Public in a Pluralistic Society?" Summary and Additional Questions. Introduction to Case 4. Case 4: "What Is Our Foundation for Community?" Reader Reactions to the Idea of Community. Reactions to "What Is Our Foundation for Community?" Reader Reactions to "What Is Our Foundation for Community?" Summary and Additional Questions. Introduction to Case 5. Case 5: "Do Convictions Divide?" Reader Reactions to Strong Student Religious Expression. Reactions to "Do Convictions Divide?" Reader Reactions to "Do Convictions Divide?" Summary and Additional Questions. Part II: Public Arguments. A "Secular View": Religion Kept Separate From the Public Arena. A"Religious View": Religious Perspectives Acknowledged Publicly. A "Personal Pluralistic View": Secular and Religious Worldviews Made Personal. Part III: A Final Argument, and Some Suggestions and Resources for Further Reflection. Religion and Teaching: An Abbreviated View. Exercises for Further Reflection. Conclusion.

About the Author

Ronald Anderson is professor of education, University of Colorado at Boulder.

About the Series

Reflective Teaching and the Social Conditions of Schooling Series

A Series for Prospective and Practicing Teachers

This series of small, accessible, interactive texts introduces the notion of teacher reflection and develops it in relation to the social conditions of schooling. The aim is to provide practicing and prospective teachers with ways to examine contextual issues of schooling and to articulate their ideas, beliefs, theories, expectations, assumptions, and feelings about those issues, and to facilitate reflection about teaching situations they face and decisions they must make on an ongoing basis. Each text focuses on a specific issue or content area in relation to teaching and follows the same format: Part I offers several case studies dealing with different aspects of book’s topic, each followed by space for readers to write their own reactions and reflections, educators’ dialogue about the case, space for readers’ reactions to the educators’ dialogue, and a summary and additional questions. Part II presents public arguments representing different views about the topic. Part III offers the authors’ personal views on some of the issues addressed, exercises for further reflection, and a list of resources. Books in this series are appropriate for teacher education courses across the curriculum.

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Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
EDU007000
EDUCATION / Curricula
EDU029000
EDUCATION / Teaching Methods & Materials / General
EDU040000
EDUCATION / Philosophy & Social Aspects