Models of Madness

Psychological, Social and Biological Approaches to Schizophrenia

© 2004 – Routledge

400 pages

Purchasing Options:
Paperback: 9781583919064
pub: 2004-03-04
US Dollars$47.95
Hardback: 9781583919057
pub: 2004-03-04
US Dollars$110.00

e–Inspection Copy

About the Book

Models of Madness shows that hallucinations and delusions are understandable reactions to life events and circumstances rather than symptoms of a supposed genetic predisposition or biological disturbance. International contributors:

* critique the 'medical model' of madness

* examine the dominance of the 'illness' approach to understanding madness from historical and economic perspectives

* document the role of drug companies

* outline the alternative to drug based solutions

* identify the urgency and possibility of prevention of madness.

Models of Madness promotes a more humane and effective response to treating severely distressed people that will prove essential reading for psychiatrists and clinical psychologists and of great interest to all those who work in the mental health service. This book forms part of the International Society for the Psychological Treatment of Psychoses series edited by Brian Martindale.


"Essential reading for all those involved with the mental health system, this book is apowerful, scholarly, up-to-date critique of biological approaches to madness and the role of the pharmaceutical industry, together with well presented and refreshing analyses of psychological and social approaches."- Terence McLaughlin, Mental Health Today, November 2004

"This is a wonderful book. It's a scholarly academic text that is very well supported by the literature in the field, but remains easy to read and understand, which is no mean feat, given the complexity of the material. it covers." - Lynne Huddleston in Manawatu Standard, 10 July 2004

"This is mandatory reading for all psychiatrists. Read et al. have issued a serious challenge to psychiatry. Are we totally on the wrong track with both understanding and treating schizophrenia? Are we doing more to create mental disorder than to prevent it? Since we have shuffled off responsibility for almost everything except mental illness, this challenge to the medical model suggests that we may have sawn off the last branch on which we had any purchase." - Carolyn Quadrio, Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry

"Models of Madness is a considerable achievement. The authority and accessibility of its robust arguments will make it a popular and classic text. It will stimulate thought in a system that has been lacking thought… Models of Madness will win many hearts and minds, and the mental health care of patients will be better for it." - Richard Duggins, Regional Dept. of Psychotherapy, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK

Table of Contents

Part I: The Illness Model of 'Schizophrenia'. Read, Mosher, Bentall, 'Schizophrenia' is Not an Illness. Read, A History of Madness. Read, The Invention of 'Schizophrenia'. Read, Masson, Genetics, Eugenics and Mass Murder. Read, Does 'Schizophrenia' Exist? Reliability and Validity. Read, Biological Psychiatry's Lost Cause. Joseph, Schizophrenia and Heredity: Why the Emperor Has no Genes. Read, Electroconvulsive Therapy. Ross, Read, Antipsychotic Medication: Myths and Facts. Mosher, Gosden, Beder, Drug Companies and Schizophrenia: Unbridled Capitalism Meets Madness. Part II: Social and Psychological Approaches to Understanding Madness. Read, Haslam, Public Opinion: Bad Things Happen and Can Drive You Crazy. Geekie, Listening to the Voices We Hear: Clients' Understandings of Psychotic Experiences. Read, Poverty, Ethnicity and Gender. Bentall, Abandoning the Concept of Schizophrenia: The Cognitive Psychology of Hallucinations and Delusions. Silver, Koehler, Karon, Psychodynamic Psychotherapy of Schizophrenia: Its History and Development. Read, Goodman, Morrison, Ross, Aderhold, Childhood Trauma and Stress. Read, Seymour, Mosher, Unhappy Families. Part III: Evidence-based Psychosocial Interventions. Davies, Burdett,Preventing 'Schizophrenia': Creating the Conditions for Saner Societies. Chamberlin, User-run Services. Morrison, Cognitive Therapy for People with Psychosis. Gottdiener, Psychodynamic Psychotherapy for Schizophrenia: Empirical Support. Johannessen, The Development of Early Intervention Services. Aderhold, Gottwalz, Family Therapy and Schizophrenia: Replacing Ideology with Openness. Mosher, Non-hospital, Non-drug Intervention with First Episode Psychosis.

About the Series

The International Society for Psychological and Social Approaches to Psychosis Book Series

ISPS (The International Society for Psychological and Social Approaches to Psychosis) has a history stretching back more than fifty years during which it has witnessed the relentless pursuit of biological explanations for psychosis. The tide has been turning in recent years and there is a welcome international resurgence of interest in a range of psychological factors that have considerable explanatory power and therapeutic possibilities. Governments, professional groups, people with personal experience of psychosis and family members are increasingly expecting interventions that involve more talking and listening. Many now regard practitioners skilled in psychological therapies as an essential component of the care of people with psychosis.

ISPS is a global society. It aims to promote psychological and social approaches both to understanding and to treating psychosis. It also aims to bring together different perspectives on these issues. ISPS is composed of individuals, networks and institutional members from a wide range of backgrounds and is especially concerned that those with personal experience of psychosis and their family members are fully involved in our activities alongside practitioners and researchers, and that all benefit from this. Our members recognise the potential humanitarian and therapeutic potential of skilled psychological understanding and therapy in the field of psychosis. ISPS embraces a wide spectrum of approaches from psychodynamic, systemic, cognitive, and arts therapies to need-adapted and dialogical approaches, family and group therapies and residential therapeutic communities.

We are also most interested in establishing meaningful dialogue with those practitioners and researchers who are more familiar with biological-based approaches. There is increasing empirical evidence for the interaction of genes and biology with the emotional and social environment, and there are important examples of the impact of life experiences in the fields of trauma, attachment, social relationships and therapy.

ISPS activities include regular international and national conferences, newsletters and email discussion groups. Routledge has recognised the importance of our field in publishing both the book series and the ISPS journal: Psychosis - Psychological, Social and Integrative Approaches with the two complementing one another. The series started in 2004 and by 2015 it contained 19 books and 2 monographs, with further publications in preparation. A wide range of topics are covered and we hope this reflects some success in our aim of bringing together a rich range of perspectives.

The book series is intended as a resource for a broad range of mental health professionals, as well as those developing and implementing policy and people whose interest in psychosis is at a personal level. We aim for rigorous academic standards and at the same time accessibility to a wide range of readers, and for the books to promote the ideas of clinicians and researchers who may be well known in some countries, but not so familiar in others. Our overall intention is to encourage the dissemination of existing knowledge and ideas, promote productive debate, and encourage more research in a most important field whose secrets certainly do not all reside in the neurosciences.

This series also includes a monograph strand, which consists of high-level academic texts aimed at researchers, academics and postgraduate students. Within the monograph strand the focus tends to be somewhat more conceptual, and less directly clinical, than in the main strand.

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Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
PSYCHOLOGY / Clinical Psychology
PSYCHOLOGY / Psychopathology / General