Early Modern Catholics, Royalists, and Cosmopolitans: English Transnationalism and the Christian Commonwealth (Hardback) book cover

Early Modern Catholics, Royalists, and Cosmopolitans

English Transnationalism and the Christian Commonwealth

By Brian C. Lockey

© 2015 – Routledge

388 pages

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Description

Early Modern Catholics, Royalists, and Cosmopolitans considers how the marginalized perspective of 16th-century English Catholic exiles and 17th-century English royalist exiles helped to generate a form of cosmopolitanism that was rooted in contemporary religious and national identities but also transcended those identities. Author Brian C. Lockey argues that English discourses of nationhood were in conversation with two opposing 'cosmopolitan' perspectives, one that sought to cultivate and sustain the emerging English nationalism and imperialism and another that challenged English nationhood from the perspective of those Englishmen who viewed the kingdom as one province within the larger transnational Christian commonwealth. Lockey illustrates how the latter cosmopolitan perspective, produced within two communities of exiled English subjects, separated in time by half a century, influenced fiction writers such as Sir Philip Sidney, Edmund Spenser, Anthony Munday, Sir John Harington, John Milton, and Aphra Behn. Ultimately, he shows that early modern cosmopolitans critiqued the emerging discourse of English nationhood from a traditional religious and political perspective, even as their writings eventually gave rise to later secular Enlightenment forms of cosmopolitanism.

Reviews

"Ambitiously spanning two centuries and numerous source texts, Brian Lockey’s Early Modern Catholics, Royalists and Cosmopolitans is a thorough and thought-provoking study into a newly emerging discourse on cosmopolitanism within England in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries… Well-evidenced and intriguing, Lockey has produced a work that will be approached in years to come from many different disciplines. This book will be invaluable to any critics of religious identities, nation, and selfhood within the early modern period." - Sophie Jane Buckingham, University of East Anglia, Renaissance Studies

"The book as a whole is lively, interesting, and brings a welcome internationalist perspective to the study of early-modern English literature. Throughout, there is a welcome emphasis on Latinity (Osorio, Haddon, Campion) and on translation (Harington, Fanshawe) as parallel vehicles of international communication within Christian Europe… Each of [these chapters] teases out internationalist concerns within the works they cover. At the very least they remind us that even the most Protestant fictions in early modern England were not as straight-forwardly nationalist as recent scholarship might lead us to think." - Paul Arblaster, Saint-Louis University, Brussels, Reformation

"Lockey clearly emphasizes that 'English cosmopolitanism was first and foremost traditional and conservative' (314), although it served as a challenge to the emerging national narratives, and it contained the potential to be stripped of its more obviously conservative manifestations. It could be employed, for example, by writers who were working in the Protestant tradition, who introduced a transnational approach inherited from 'a prohibited ideology' (315). His monograph offers a careful exploration of early modern texts and a thought-provoking read for scholars working in the discipline of history as well as English literature." Katy Gibbons, University of Portsmouth, Renaissance Quarterly.

"Lockey’s book is an important one that, in its pairing of canonical texts with less- studied texts from both England and the Continent, makes a valuable contribution to current conversations about religion, national identity, and political culture in early modern Europe." - Laurie Ellinghausen, Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies

"Early Modern Catholics, Royalties and Cosmopolitans powerfully reveals that cosmopolitanism is a much earlier phenomenon than seventeenth-and-eighteenth century critics have suggested. This is a well-argued and innovative book, generous in its attention to detail and its concern to establish clarity of purpose for its readership. Lockey ranges across genres, geograhies, and centuries with eloquent ease, alert to both the telling detail and the killing point. This is a book that will be invaluable to early modern academics interested in nation, religion, and identity formation, broadly conceived. It is also a book of enduring and impressive scholarship, as well as a very good read." - Claire Jowitt, University of East Anglia, The Sixteenth Century Journal

Table of Contents

Contents: Introduction: Catholics, royalists, cosmopolitans: writing early modern England into the Christian commonwealth. Part I: Papal supremacy and the citizen of the world; Border-crossing and translation: the cosmopolitics of Edmund Campion, S.J., Anthony Munday, and Sir John Harington; Cosmopolitan romance: Philip Sidney, Edmund Spenser, and the fiction of imperial justice; Traitor or cosmopolitan? Captain Thomas Stukeley in the courts of Christendom. Part II: Part II introduction: Royalists; From foreign war to civil war: the royalist reinvention of the Christian commonwealth; The Christian nation and beyond: Camões's Os Lusíadas and John Milton’s Cosmopolitan Republic; Royalist turned cosmopolitan: Aphra Behn’s portrait of the prostituted sovereign. Conclusion: the public sphere and the legacy of the Christian commonwealth; Works cited; Index.

About the Author

Brian C. Lockey is Professor of English Literature at St. John's University, USA. He is also the author of Law and Empire in English Renaissance Literature (Cambridge, 2006).

About the Series

Transculturalisms, 1400-1700

This series presents studies of the early modern contacts and exchanges among the states, polities and entrepreneurial organizations of Europe; Asia, including the Levant and East India/Indies; Africa; and the Americas. Books investigate travellers, merchants and cultural inventors, including explorers, mapmakers, artists and writers, as they operated in political, mercantile, sexual and linguistic economies. We encourage authors to reflect on their own methodologies in relation to issues and theories relevant to the study of transculturism/translation and transnationalism. We are particularly interested in work on and from the perspective of the Asians, Africans, and Americans involved in these interactions, and on such topics as:

-Material exchanges, including textiles, paper and printing, and technologies of knowledge

-Movements of bodies: embassies, voyagers, piracy, enslavement

-Travel writing: its purposes, practices, forms and effects on writing in other genres

-Belief systems: religions, philosophies, sciences

-Translations: verbal, artistic, philosophical

-Forms of transnational violence and its representations.

Learn more…

Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
HIS037040
HISTORY / Modern / 17th Century
LIT019000
LITERARY CRITICISM / Renaissance