Ideology and Foreign Policy in Early Modern Europe (1650-1750): 1st Edition (Hardback) book cover

Ideology and Foreign Policy in Early Modern Europe (1650-1750)

1st Edition

By Gijs Rommelse

Edited by David Onnekink

Routledge

334 pages

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Description

The years 1650 to 1750 - sandwiched between an age of 'wars of religion' and an age of 'revolutionary wars' - have often been characterized as a 'de-ideologized' period. However, the essays in this collection contend that this is a mistaken assumption. For whilst international relations during this time may lack the obvious polarization between Catholic and Protestant visible in the proceeding hundred years, or the highly charged contest between monarchies and republics of the late eighteenth century, it is forcibly argued that ideology had a fundamental part to play in this crucial transformative stage of European history. Many early modernists have paid little attention to international relations theory, often taking a 'Realist' approach that emphasizes the anarchism, materialism and power-political nature of international relations. In contrast, this volume provides alternative perspectives, viewing international relations as socially constructed and influenced by ideas, ideology and identities. Building on such theoretical developments, allows international relations after 1648 to be fundamentally reconsidered, by putting political and economic ideology firmly back into the picture. By engaging with, and building upon, recent theoretical developments, this collection treads new terrain. Not only does it integrate cultural history with high politics and foreign policy, it also engages directly with themes discussed by political scientists and international relations theorists. As such it offers a fresh, and genuinely interdisciplinary approach to this complex and fundamental period in Europe's development.

Reviews

'This collection is a successful analysis of the close connection between ideology and foreign policy in Europe between 1650 and 1750.' Sixteenth Century Journal 'Overall, this is a collection which should find a place in university libraries: the general standard of essays is higher than in many such compilations, and several are of real importance.' English Historical Review '… one of this volume’s strengths is the coherent dialogue it engenders between contributions. It succeeds in this by inviting contributions from not only established historians, but also from early-career scholars whose densely-argued, source-driven articles suggest new avenues of research… the volume emanates from and contributes to the lively discussion on the nature and conduct of Williamite foreign policy and its legacies.' Tijdschrift voor Geschiedenis ’…[A] remarkable volume…’ The Seventeenth Century

About the Author/Editor

David Onnekink, Universiteit Utrecht, NL; and Gijs Rommelse, The Netherlands Institute of Military History, The Hague, NL.

About the Series

Politics and Culture in Europe, 1650-1750

Politics and Culture in Europe, 1650-1750
Politics and Culture in Europe, 1650-1750 Focusing on the years between the end of the Thirty Years' War and the end of the War of the Austrian Succession, this series seeks to broaden scholarly knowledge of this crucial period that witnessed the solidification of Europe into centralized nation states and created a recognizably modern political map. Bridging the gap between the early modern period of the Reformation and the eighteenth century of colonial expansion and industrial revolution, these years provide a fascinating era of study in which nationalism, political dogma, economic advantage, scientific development, cultural and artistic interests and strategic concerns began to compete with religion as the driving force of European relations and national foreign policies. The period under investigation, the second half of the seventeenth century and the first half of the eighteenth, corresponds with the decline of Spanish power and the rise of French hegemony that was only to be finally broken following the defeat of Napoleon in 1815. This shifting political power base presented opportunities and dangers for many countries, resulting in numerous alliances between formerly hostile nations attempting to consolidate or increase their international influence, or restrain that of a rival. These contests of power were closely bound up with political, cultural and economic issues: particularly the strains of state building, trade competition, religious tension and toleration, accommodating flows of migrants and refugees, the birth pangs of rival absolutist and representative systems of government, radical structures of credit, and new ways in which wider publics interacted with authority. Despite this being a formative period in the formation of the European landscape, there has been relatively little research on it compared to the earlier Reformation, and the later revolutionary eras. By providing a forum that encourages scholars to engage with the forces that were shaping the continent - either in a particular country, or taking a trans-national or comparative approach - it is hoped a greater understanding of this pivotal era will be forthcoming.

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Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
HIS037040
HISTORY / Modern / 17th Century