Alaturka: Style in Turkish Music (1923–1938) (Hardback) book cover

Alaturka: Style in Turkish Music (1923–1938)

By John Morgan O'Connell

© 2013 – Routledge

306 pages

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Paperback: 9781138245860
pub: 2016-08-26
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About the Book

The early-Republican era (1923-1938) was a major period of musical and cultural change in Turkey. Alaturka: Style in Turkish Music is a study of the significance of style in Turkish music and, in particular, the polemical debate about an eastern style of Turkish music (called, alaturka) that developed during this rich and complicated era of Turkish history. Representing more than twenty years of research, the book explores the stylistic categories that show the intersection between music and culture; the different chapters treat musical materials, musical practices and musical contexts in turn. Informed by critical approaches to musical aesthetics in ethnomusicology as well as musicology and anthropology, the book focuses upon a native discourse about musical style, highlighting a contemporary apprehension about the appropriate constitution of a national identity. The argument over style discloses competing conceptions of Turkish space and time where definitions of the east and the west, and interpretations of the past and the present respectively were hotly contested. John Morgan O'Connell makes a significant contribution to the study of Turkish music in particular and Turkish history in general. Conceived as a historical ethnography, the book brings together archival sources and ethnographic materials to provide a critical revision of Turkish historiography, music providing a locus for interrogating singular representations of a national past.

Reviews

'Alaturka represents a monumental study that meticulously traces and analyzes the stylistic shaping of a single artist’s career to illuminate larger issues of national culture in a post-Ottoman state. As an ethnomusicological engagement with history, the book persuades us of the embeddedness of music and the literary arts in social history, and, it is hoped, will inspire further cross-disciplinary scholarship related to music in cultural studies of the Middle East and beyond.' Ethnomusicology

Table of Contents

Contents: Preface; Prologue: style in Turkish music; Defining style; Debating style; A Turkish stylist; Presenting style; Representing style; Concert style; Social style; Epilogue: style in Turkish history; Appendices; Bibliography; Index.

About the Author

John Morgan O’Connell is director of the programme in Ethnomusicology at Cardiff University. His publications principally concern the musical traditions of the Islamic world, being especially interested in issues related to music and conflict, and music in application. He has also acted as a music consultant for a number of international organizations.

About the Series

SOAS Musicology Series

SOAS Musicology Series

Series Editor: Keith Howard, SOAS, University of London, UK

The study of the world’s many and diverse music cultures has become an important part of the discipline of musicology. Often termed ‘ethnomusicology’, the resulting studies share the fundamental recognition that music is cherished by every society in the world. Like language, music is a universal means of individual and cultural expression. It is also infinitely varied. Music in any society has intrinsic value in its own right, and can tell us much about the culture in which it developed. The core of the SOAS Musicology Series comprises studies of different musics, analysed in the contexts of the societies of which they are part, and exploring repertories, performance practice, musical instruments, and the roles and impacts of individual composers and performers. Studies which integrate music with dance, theatre or the visual arts are encouraged, and contextualised studies of music within the Western art canon are not excluded.

Reflecting current ethnomusicological theory and practice, the editors recognize the value of interdisciplinary and collaborative research. Volumes may utilize methodologies developed in anthropology, sociology, linguistics and psychology to explore music; they may seek to create a dialogue between scholars and musicians; or they may primarily be concerned with the evaluation of historical documentation. Monographs that explore contemporary and popular musics, the effect of globalization on musical production, or the comparison of different music cultures are also welcomed.

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Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
MUS024000
MUSIC / Genres & Styles / International