Law, Development and Globalization

Series Editor: Julio Faundez

During the past two decades, a substantial transformation of law and legal institutions in developing and transition countries has taken place. Whether prompted by the policy prescriptions of the so-called Washington consensus, the wave of democratization, the international human rights movement or the emergence of new social movements, no area of law has been left untouched. This massive transformation is attracting the attention of legal scholars, as well as scholars from other disciplines, such as politics, economics, sociology, anthropology and history. This diversity is valuable because it promotes cross-disciplinary dialogue and cooperation. It is also important because today the study of law cannot ignore the process of globalization, which is multifaceted and thus calls for inter-disciplinary skills and perspectives. Indeed, as globalization deepens, legal institutions at the national level are influenced and shaped by rules, practices and ideas drawn, imposed or borrowed from abroad.

This book series provides a platform for scholars and development practitioners concerned with the nature, scope and impact of the legal changes taking place in developing and transition countries. Proposals for monographs or edited collections are invited in the following areas:

- Theoretical studies that consider issues such as the relationship between law and social change, law and political institutions, the linkages between domestic and international legal regimes and the rights approach to development

- Case studies on topics such as access to justice, land law, legal pluralism, legal systems and institutions, social movements, participation and constitutionalism, corporate social responsibility, international standards and domestic laws, trade and investment and gender and equal opportunity law

- Policy studies that provide practical information and analysis about the design, implementation and evaluation of projects aimed at transforming legal institutions.

To discuss or propose an idea for a book, please contact:

Professor Julio Faundez

e-mail j.faundez@warwick.ac.uk Tel. + 44 (0) 2476 523119.

School of Law, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, United Kingdom