1st Edition

A History of Ireland Under the Union 1801-1922

By P. S. O'Hegarty Copyright 1952
    824 Pages
    by Routledge

    824 Pages
    by Routledge

    Originally published in 1952, A History of Ireland Under the Union was written by an historian who played an active part in the political events of the later part of the period. In Ireland there are two national traditions: that of the Kingdom of the Gael, established at the end of the 4th Century A.D. and the other colonial tradition evolved by the descendants of various generations of Planters from England. The book provides a full account of 19th Century Irish history and shows how the colonial nationalists discarded their nationalism after 1801 and how the emerging Gael, under Daniel O’ Connell adopted and fused the two traditions into an Irish national tradition which was vitalised by Irish literature and culture. Containing much original source material the book throws light on aspects of Irish history whose significance is often overlooked such as the part played by the RIC and the Secret Societies in Ireland and the USA.

    1. The Union, 1801 2. The Insurrection of Robert Emmet, 1803 3. Regrouping 4. Catholic Agitation 5. Daniel O’Connell 6. The Question of the Veto, 1815 7. The First Sinn Fein Organisation, 1823-1829 8. Catholic Emancipation, 1829 9. After Emancipation – Regrouping 10. Parliamentarianism, 1829 11. O’Connell Demands Repeal of the Union, 1830 12. The Repeal Movement – The First Phase, 1910-1834 13. Justice for Ireland – Thomas Drummond, 1835-1840 14. The Repeal Movement – The Second Phase, 1838 15. The Nation – 1842 16. The Repeal Movement – The Corporation Debate and the Monster Meetings, 1843 17. The Repeal Movement – The Crisis – The Clontarf Meeting, 1843 18. The Repeal Movement – After Clontarf, 1844 19. The Repeal Movement – Federalism – The Decline, 1844 20. The Repeal Movement – Academic Education – O’Connell Attacks Davis, The Nation and Young Ireland, 1845 21. The Repeal Movement – The Death of Thomas Davis, 1845 22. The Repeal Movement – O’Connell Breaks with Young Ireland 1845 23. The Death of O’Connell, 1847 24. The Irish Confederation – 1847 25. The Great Starvation - The Passing of Old Ireland, 1845,6,7 26. The Insurrection of 1848 – The Passing of Young Ireland 27. Economic Conditions – Land and Life, 1801-1848 28. Education – The Irish Language, 1801-1848 29. The Church, 1801-1848 30. The Irish Constabulary, 1836-1922 31. In the Depths – The Tenant Right League, 1849-1855 32. The Stirring of the Bones – The IRB, or Fenian Movement – The Laying of the Foundations, 1856-1859 33. The Fenian Movement - The Movement Grows, 1860-3 34. The Fenian Movement, The Irish People, 1863-5 35. The Fenian Movement – The Organisation to 1865 36. The Fenian Movement – The Insurrection of 5th March, 1867 37. The Rescue of Kelly and Deasy, The Manchester Martyrs, 1867 38. Enter Gladstone – The First Breach in the Union – The Disestablishment of the Protestant Church in Ireland, 1869 39. The Beginning of the Undoing of the Conquest – The Land Act of 1870 40. The Home Rule Movement – Isaac Butt, 1870 41. The Home Rule Movement – Enter Parnell, 1875 42. The Home Rule Movement – Michael Davitt – The New Departure, 1878 43. The Home Rule Movement – The Land League, 1879-1880 44. The Home Rule Movement – Through Coercion to the Land Act of 1881 45. The Home Rule Movement – Through More coercion to the Kilmainham Treaty, 1881-2 46. The Home Rule Movement – The Invincibles – The Assassination of Burke and Cavendish, 1882 47. The Home Rule Movement – Through More Coercion to the First Home Rule Bill, 1882-1886 48. The Home Rule Movement – The Defeat of the Home Rule Bill, 1886 49. The Home Rule Movement – Coercion Again – Large Scale Attack on Parnell, 1886-1890 50. Maintenance of the Attack on Parnell – O’Shea Intervenes – The Split, 1890 51. The Home Rule Movement - Death of the Lion, 1891 52. The Home Rule Movement - The Home Rule Bill of 1893 – The Passing of Gladstone, 1892-4 53. The Home Rule Movement – The Decline, 1892-1918 54. The Home Rule Movement – The Policy of Coercion and Concession ‘Killing Home Rule by Kindness’ 1886-1912 55. The Sinn Fein Movement – The Gaelic Athletic Association, 1884 56. The Sinn Fein Movement – The Gaelic League and the Revival of the Irish Language, 1893 57. The Sinn Fein Movement – Self Help in Agriculture – Sir Horace Plunkett and the Co-operative Movement, 1889 58. The Sinn Fein Movement – The Leader, the Industrial Revival – and Mr. D. P. Moran, 1900 59. The Sinn Fein Movement – The Literary Awakening 60. The Sinn Fein Movement – The Separatist Revival – The United Irishman – and Arthur Griffith, 1899 61. The Sinn Fein Movement – The Resurrection of Hungary, 1904 52. The Sinn Fein Movement – The Sinn Fein Policy, 1904-1908 53. The Sinn Fein Movement - The Policy Hangs Fire, 1908-1912 54. The Home Rule Bill of 1912 55. The Sinn Fein Movement – The Irish Volunteers, 1913-14 56. The Sinn Fein Movement – The Irish Volunteers, 1914-16 57. The Sinn Fein Movement – The European War – Redmond Throws in his Hand, 1914 58. The Sinn Fein Movement – The Insurrection of 1916 59. The Sinn Fein Movement – After the Insurrection 60. The Sinn Fein Movement – The Sinn Fein Convention of 1917 61. The Sinn Fein Movement – The General Election of 1918 – Dáil Éireann, 1918-19 62. The De Jure Republic – England’s Reaction, 1919-20 63. The Sinn Fein Movement – England Lays On and then cries ‘Hold, Enough!’ 1919-21 64. The Sinn Fein Movement – The Partition Bill, 1920-21 65. The Sinn Fein Movement – The Anglo-Irish Treaty of 1921 26. The Sinn Fein Movement – The Dail Accepts the Treaty, 1921-22 67. What the Treaty Did 68. Ireland, 1922. Epilogue: From the Acceptance of the Treaty by Dáil Éireann to de Valéra’s Acceptance of it, 1922-27.

    Biography

    P. S. O'Hegarty was an Irish writer, editor and historian.

    Reviews of the original edition of The Irish Free State

    ‘The author of this book is an Irishman, who keeps his head clear, and has the requisite knowledge of political theories, ideas and systems…to make his book one of the most interesting that has yet been written about the political evolution of the Irish state.’ Irish Times

    ‘…such a book has long been wanted…this book cannot fail to be of great interest to all students of modern political development.’ International Affairs

    ‘A work which gives a very tolerably just and sane view of the position in 1934…He has mastered his Irish material fairly and interprets it sensibly…he presents his data fully and fairly for the reader’s judgement.’ Times Literary Supplement.