A World History of Railway Cultures, 1830-1930: Volume I, 1st Edition (Hardback) book cover

A World History of Railway Cultures, 1830-1930

Volume I, 1st Edition

Edited by Matthew D. Esposito

Routledge

760 pages

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Description

This 4-volume collection is the first compilation of primary sources to historicize the cultural impact of railways on a global scale from their inception in Great Britain to the Great Depression. Gathered together are over 200 rare out-of-print published and unpublished materials from archival and digital repositories throughout the world. Organized by historical geography, this first volume covers the United Kingdom.

Table of Contents

Volume I. The United Kingdom

Table of Contents

Author Acknowledgements

Part 1: The Rocket, Rainhill Trials, and Early Promotion of Railways

1. Early Illustrations of the Rocket and Liverpool and Manchester trains.

Figure 1. The Rocket with wagon car from the cover of Mechanics’ Magazine, 24 October, 1829.

Figure 2. Isaac Shaw’s lithograph of Liverpool and Manchester passenger train. S. G. Hughes aquatint (1831). Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection.

Figure 3. Isaac Shaw’s lithograph of Liverpool and Manchester freight train. S. G. Hughes aquatint (1831). Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection.

2. The Rainhill Trials and Inauguration of the Liverpool & Manchester Railway, "Account of the Competition of Locomotive Steam-Carriages on the Liverpool and Manchester Railway," in Mechanics’ Magazine 12: 322 (October 10, 1829), 114-116; 12: 323 (October 17, 1829), 135-141; 12: 324 (October 24, 1829), 146-147; 12: 325 (October 31, 1829), 161; 14: 372 (September 25, 1830), 64-69.

3. Charles Maclaren. Railways Compared with Canals & Common Roads, and Their Uses and Advantages Explained. Edinburgh: Constable, 1825, pp. 48-54.

4. Nineteenth-Century Engravings, Lithographs, and Prints.

Figure 4. "View of the Entrance to the Liverpool and Manchester Railway." Mechanics’ Magazine XIV: 342 (September 25, 1830).

Figure 5. Isaac Shaw. "View on the Liverpool and Manchester Railway with the Locomotive "Twin Sisters" in a Siding." (1830). Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection.

Figure 6. Isaac Shaw. "Opening of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway," (1830). Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection.

Figure 7. Isaac Shaw. "Railway Office Liverpool," (1830). Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection.

Figure 8. "Metropolitan Railway." The Wonders of the Universe: A Record of Things Wonderful and Marvelous in Nature, Science, and Art (New York: Cassell & Co., 1885), 53.

Part 2: Engineering Enemies

5. Joseph Sandars. A Letter on the Subject of the Projected Rail Road between Liverpool and Manchester. Second ed. London: W. Wales, 1824, pp. 3-32.

6. "Second Prospectus of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway Company," Liverpool Mercury XV (30 December 1825), 203.

7. George Eliot. Middlemarch. New edition. Edinburgh and London: W. Blackwood, 1874, pp. 407-414.

8. The Creevy Papers: A Selection from the Correspondence & Diaries of the Late Thomas Creevy. Ed. Sir Herbert Maxwell. New York: E. P. Dutton, 1904, pp, 429-431, 545-546.

9. William Wordsworth, ‘On the Projected Kendel and Windermere Railway’, 147, "Letters on the Kendal and Windermere Railway, 301-311" From Vol. 8 of The Poetical Works of William Wordsworth. Ed. William Angus Knight. (Edinburgh: W. Paterson, 1888-1889), p. 147, 301-311

Part 3: Cultures of Railway Construction

10. John Francis. A History of the English Railway: Its Social Relations and Revelations. 2 vols. London: Longman, Brown, Green, & Longmans, 1851. Vol. 2, Chapter 3 pp. 67-91.

11. Benjamin Disraeli. Sybil or The Two Nations. London: Longmans, Green, and Co., 1913, pp. 433-441.

12. Stephen W. Fullom, "The Brawl Viaduct", "English and Irish" and "The Reward of Merit," in The Great Highway: A Story of the World’s Struggles. Third ed. London: G. Routledge & Co., 1854, pp. 119-146.

13. Patrick MacGill. Children of the Dead End: The Autobiography of a Navvy. London: H. Jenkins, 1914, pp. 129-145, 209-212, 225-229, 254-262.

14. Patrick MacGill. "A Platelayer’s Story" and "The Navvy’s Sunday" and from Gleanings from a Navvy’s Scrapbook. Second ed. Derry, North Ireland: Derry Journal, 1911, pp. 52-53, 55.

Part 4: Novel Impressions: Early Victorian Railway Cultures

15. Frances Ann Kemble. Records of a Girlhood. Second ed. New York: H. Holt, 1884, 278-284.

16. ‘Railroad Travelling’, Herapath’s Railway Journal [The Railway Magazine] 1 (Mar.-Dec. 1836), 110-112.

17. Charles Greville. Memoirs (Second Part): A Journal of the Reign of Queen Victoria from 1837 to 1852. 3 vols. Ed. Henry Reeve. New York: D. Appleton and Co., 1885. I, p. 11.

18. William Makepeace Thackeray, ‘Two Days in Wicklow’, in The Paris Sketch Book of Mr. M.A. Titmarsh, The Irish Sketch Book, & Notes of a Journey from Cornhill to Grand Cairo. New York: Caxton, 1840, pp. 491-493.

19. William Makepeace Thackeray, "Physiology of the London Idler," Punch 3 (1842), p. 102, "Railway Parsimony," Punch 13 (1847), 150, "Natural Phenomenon," Punch 14 (1848), 87, and "Railway Charges," Punch 14 (1848), 218.

20. Albert Richard Smith. The Struggles and Adventures of Christopher Tadpole at Home and Abroad. London: Willoughby, [1847], pp. 481-483.

21. Charles Dickens, "Paul’s Second Deprivation," in Dombey and Son. 2 Vols. New York: Harper & Bros, 1852. I: 70-72.

22. Charles Dickens, "Mugby Junction" in Stories from the Christmas Numbers of "Household Words" and "All Year Round." New York: Macmillan and Co., 1896. PP. 464-465, 500-512.

23. Charles Dickens, Our Mutual Friend (New York: Macmillan, 1907), p. 720.

24. Charles Dickens, "A Flight," in Reprinted Pieces. New York: University Society, 1908. PP. 151-161.

Part 5: Timetables, Calendars, and Stations: Mid-Victorian Railway Cultures

25. Henry Booth. An Account of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway, "Considerations, Moral, Commercial, Economical." Liverpool: Wales and Baines, 1830, pp. 85-94.

26. "Easter Travelling," Illustrated London News, 29 April 1905, 626.

27. Figure 9. William Powell Frith. "The Railway Station." [Paddington Station] (1862).

28. George Catlin. Adventures of the Ojibbeway and Ioway Indians in England, France, and Belgium. Third ed. London: n.p., 1852, pp. 15, 17, 20-26, 34-35, 123-127, 129, 145-146.

29. John Overton Choules, Young Americans Abroad. Boston: Gould and Lincoln, 1853, pp. 48-52, 92-95.

30. Miss [Julia] Pardoe, ‘On the Rail’, Reginald Lyle. New York: Burgess & Day, 1854, pp. 103-106.

31. Elizabeth Gaskell, ‘Mischances’ North and South. London: Oxford University Press, 1908, pp. 312-317.

32. George Augustus Sala, "The Art of Sucking Eggs" in, Temple Bar 1 (1861), 558-564.

33. Miss. Muloch (Dinah Maria Mulock Craik), A Life for a Life: A Novel. New York: Carleton, 1864, pp. 196-197.

34. Frances Eleanor Trollope, Veronica, "The Railway Waiting Room.", in All the Year Round, New Series V.2 (September 25, 1869), p. 386.

35. G. K. Chesterton, ‘The Prehistoric Railway Station’, in Tremendous Truffles (New York: Dodd, Mead, 1909), pp. 260-267.

Part 6: Subterranean Railways and the Underground: High Victorian Railway Cultures

36. ‘The Metropolitan Subterranean Railway’, The Times (London), 30 November 1861, p. 5.

37. Mortimer Collins, The Vivian Romance (New York: Harper, 1870), pp. 31-32.

38. M. E. Braddon, ‘On the Track’, from Henry Dunbar: The Story of an Outcast, Three Vols. (London: J. Maxwell, 1866), III, pp. 187-201.

39. M. E. Braddon, The Lovels of Arden (Leipzig: B. Tauchnitz, 1871), pp. 92-97.

40. Figure 10. Gustave Doré. The Workmen's Train, Ludgate Hill, and Over the City by Railway. Illustrations originally printed in Doré and Blanchard Jerrold, London: A Pilgrimage. London: Grant, 1872.

41. Lady Margaret Majendie, ‘A Railway Journey’, Blackwood’s Magazine 121 (April 1877), pp. 497-503.

42. Figure 11. Cover Illustration of H. L. Williams’s adaptation of Dion Boucicault’s play After Dark (1880s), depicting railway rescue scene in the London Underground/Subterranean Railway.

43. Dion Boucicault, scene II from After Dark: A Drama of London Life in 1868, in Four Acts. (New York: DeWitt, n.d.) pp. 36-37.

Part 7: Netherworlds and Nostalgia: Late Victorian and Edwardian Railway Cultures

44. George Gissing, ‘10 Saturnalia!’, in The Nether World (London: Smith, Elder, & Co., 1890), pp. 105-113.

45. James John Hissey, Through Ten English Counties (London: Richard Bentley & Son, 1894), pp. 392-393.

46. Thomas Hardy, Jude the Obscure (New York: Harper and Brothers, 1896), pp. 341-343.

47. Arthur Quiller-Couch, ‘The Cuckoo Valley Railway’ and ‘Punch’s Understudy’, in The Delectable Duchy: Stories, Studies, and Sketches (New York: C. Scribners’ Sons, 1898), pp. 61-69, 107-115.

48. George John Whyte-Melville, The Brookes of Bridlemere (London: Ward, Lock, 1899), pp. 156-161, 200-205.

49. H. G. Wells, When the Sleeper Wakes (New York: Harper & Bros., 1899), pp. 201-211.

50. Henry James, ‘London’, English Hours (Boston: Houghton, Mifflin and Co., 1905), pp. 36-39.

51. Henry James, ‘Isle of Wight’, Portraits of Places (Boston: Houghton, Mifflin and Co., [1911]), pp. 292-294.

52. E. Nesbit, ‘Saviours of the Train’, The Railway Children (London and New York: Macmillan, 1906), pp. 127-137.

53. E. M. Forster, Howards End (New York: G. P. Putnam Sons, 1911), pp. 12-19.

Part 8: The Railway Accident, Public Health, and Military Deployment

54. ‘Wolverhampton’, The Spectator, February 24, 1838, pp. 176-177.

55. ‘In the Temple Gardens’, Temple Bar 2 (July, 1861), pp. 286-287.

56. ‘Armagh’, The Spectator, June 15, 1889, 813.

57. ‘The Influence of Railway Travelling on Public Health’, The Lancet, 1862, pp. 15-17.

58. John Charles Hall, ‘Railway Accidents’, in Medical Evidence in Railway Accidents (London: Longmans & Co. 1868), pp. 27-42.

59. ‘Navvies for the Crimea’ and ‘The Balaclava Railway Corps’, Illustrated London News, 13 January 1855, 28-29, 304.

60. ‘The Invasion of the Free State’, The Spectator 17 March 1900, 229.

61. Boer War: Diary of Eyre Lloyd, 2nd Coldstream Guards, Assistant Staff Officer, Colonel Benson’s Column, killed at Brakenlaagte, 30th October 1901 (London: Army and Navy Cooperative Society, 1905), pp. 3-6, 17-19, 27-28, 43, 45, 56-58, 63, 66-67, 71-78, 105-118, 124, 131, 137-141, 153, 169-171, 187, 242, 249-250, 260, 288-289.

Part 9: The Great War and Interwar Railway Cultures

62. ‘Railways and the War’, in The Times History of the War 6 (1915), pp. 161, 167, 169-174.

63. Edwin A. Pratt, ‘Employment of Women and Girls’, in British Railways and the Great War: Organisation, Efforts, Difficulties and Achievements, 2 vols. (London: Selwyn and Blount, 1921), pp. 475-482.

64. Thomas Hardy, ‘Midnight on the Great Western’, in The Poetical Works of Thomas Hardy, 2 vols. (London: Macmillan, 1919), I, pp. 483.

65. Lord Monkswell, ‘Making Up Lost Time’, The Railway Magazine 50 (Jan.-June 1922), pp. 157-160.

66. ‘Railway Art and Literature in 1922’, The Railway Magazine 51 (July-Dec. 1922), pp. 59-66.

67. ‘Flying Scotsman’s First Run’, Times (London), 2 May 1928, p. 13.

68. Frank Parker Stockbridge, ‘Cargoes through the Clouds’, Harper’s 140, 1919-1920, pp. 189-191.

Part 10: Railway Cultures of Scotland and Ireland

69. Anon. [David Croal], Early Recollections of a Journalist, 1832-1859 (Edinburgh: Andrew Eliot, 1898), pp. 8-10.

70. Charles Richard Weld, Two Months in the Highlands, Orcadia, and Skye (London: Longmans, Green, Longman, and Roberts, 1860), pp. 4-6.

71. W. Edmondstoune Aytoun, Norman Sinclair 3 vols. (Edinburgh: William Blackwood and Sons, 1861), I, pp. 250-251, 271-274, II, pp. 102-114.

72. C. F. Gordon Cumming, In the Hebrides (London: Chatto & Windus, 1883), pp. 201-204, 420-422.

73. C. F. Gordon Cumming, Memories (Edinburgh: W. Blackwood, 1904), pp. 440-441.

74. ‘The Dublin and Kingstown Railway’, Dublin Penny Journal 3, 113, 30 August 1834, pp. 65-68.

75. J. Jay Smith, A Summer’s Jaunt across the Water (Philadelphia: J. W. Moore, 1846), pp. 46-47.

76. Frederick Richard Chichester, Masters and Workmen: A Tale Illustrative of the Social and Moral Condition of the People, 3 vols. (London: Newby, 1851), I, pp. 7-17.

77. Andrew Dickinson, My First Visit to Europe (New York: G. P. Putnam, 1851), pp. 48-50.

78. Sir Francis Bond Head, A Fortnight in Ireland, 2nd ed. (London: John Murray, 1852), pp. 70, 108-114.

79. George Foxcroft Haskins, Travels in England, France, Italy and Ireland (Boston: P. Donahoe, 1856), pp. 265-266, 269.

80. Michael Cavanagh(ed.), Memoirs of General Thomas Francis Meagher Comprising the Leading Events of His Career (Worcester, Mass.: The Messenger Press, 1892), pp. 245-253.

81. C. O. Burge, The Adventures of a Civil Engineer: Fifty Years on Five Continents (London: Alston Rivers, 1909), pp. 8-13, 47-53.

82. J. M. Synge, In Wicklow, West Kerry and Connemara (Dublin: Maunsel, 1911), pp. 65-67, 157-165.

83. J. M. Synge, The Aran Islands, 4 vols. (Dublin: Maunsel, 1912). I, pp. 115-120.

84. Joseph Tatlow. Fifty Years of Railway Life in England, Scotland and Ireland (London: The Railway Gazette, 1920), pp. 110-111.

85. Padraic Colum, ‘Into Munster: On the Train’, The Road Round Ireland (New York: Macmillan, 1926), pp. 416-419.

About the Editor

Matthew Esposito is Professor of History at Drake University, USA

Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
HIS000000
HISTORY / General
HIS037060
HISTORY / Modern / 19th Century