A World History of Railway Cultures, 1830-1930: Volume II, 1st Edition (Hardback) book cover

A World History of Railway Cultures, 1830-1930

Volume II, 1st Edition

Edited by Matthew D. Esposito

Routledge

794 pages

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Description

This 4-volume collection is the first compilation of primary sources to historicize the cultural impact of railways on a global scale from their inception in Great Britain to the Great Depression. Gathered together are over 200 rare out-of-print published and unpublished materials from archival and digital repositories throughout the world. Organized by historical geography, the second volume spans the British Empire.

Table of Contents

Volume II. The British Empire

Part 1: Mobility and Mutability

1. Amelia Cary, Chow-Chow. 2 vols. (London: Hurst and Blackett, 1857), I, pp. 46-50.

2. Robert Bowne Minturn, From New York to Delhi, Second ed. (New York: D. Appleton, 1858), pp. 6, 122-126.

3. Bholanauth Chunder, The Travels of a Hindoo to Various Parts of Bengal and Upper India (London: N. Trubner, 1869), I, pp. 139-141, 149-150, 162-173, 326-327, 332-333, 348, 433 II: 130-131.

4. Figure 1, ‘Modes of Travelling in India’, Illustrated London News, September 19, 1863, 284.

5. Sidney Laman Blanchard, The Ganges and the Seine, 2 vols. (London: Chapman and Gall, 1862), II, pp. 6-13.

6. William Howard Russell, My Diary in India in the Year 1858-1859, 2 vols. (London: Routledge, 1860), I, pp. 154-162, II, pp. 407-409.

7. G. O. Trevelyan, The Competition Wallah, Second ed. (London: Macmillan, 1866), pp. 21-30.

8. Mary Carpenter, Six Months in India, 2 vols. (London: Longmans, Green, 1868), I, pp. 27-31, 227-228, 234-235, 238-239.

9. John Matheson. England to Delhi: A Narrative of Indian Travel (London: Longmans, Green, and Co., 1870), pp. 278-286, 347-348, 509-510.

Part 2: Modernity and the Masses

10. Jules Verne, Around the World in Eighty Days, trans. George M. Towle (Philadelphia: Porter & Coates, 1873), pp. 55-56, 60-62, 70-78.

11. C. F. Gordon Cumming, In the Himalayas and on the Indian Plains (London: Chatto & Windus, 1884), pp. 44-47, 76, 266-268, 274-277, 593-594.

12. James Hingston. The Australian Abroad: Branches from the Main Routes Round the World, 2 vols. (London: S. Low, Marston, Searle, and Rivington, 1879), pp. 98-101, 163-164, 200-203, 209-210.

13. W. S. Caine, A Trip Round the World in 1887-8 (London: G. Routledge & Sons, 1888), pp. 264-269, 273-276.

14. Annie Brassey, The Last Voyage: 1887 (London: Longmans, Green, 1889), pp. 99-102, 104-105.

15. Mrs. Brassey, Around the World in the Yacht "Sunbeam": Our Home on the Ocean for Eleven Months (New York: H. Holt, 1889), pp. 398-399.

16. C. F. Gordon Cumming, Two Happy Years in Ceylon, 2 vols. (London: Blackwood and Sons, 1892), I, pp. 155-159, 1716, II, pp. 27-29, 184-186, 238-239.

17. Flora Annie Steel, ‘In the Permanent Way’, In the Permanent Way and Other Stories (London: William Heinemann, 1898), pp. 27-42.

Part 3: Kipling’s Railway Kingdom

18. Rudyard Kipling, ‘An Escape Northwards’, in Out of India: Things I Saw and Failed to See in Certain Days and Nights at Jeypore and Elsewhere (New York: G. W. Dillingham, 1895), pp. 116-119.

19. Rudyard Kipling, ‘Namgay Doola’, from Mine Own People, in Works, 15 vols. (New York: Lovell, n.d.), I, pp. 31-37.

20. Rudyard Kipling, ‘The Man Who Would Be King’, in Works, 15 vols. (New York: Lovell, 1899), V, pp. 92-99.

21. Rudyard Kipling, Letters of Marque’, Works, 15 vols. (New York: Lovell, 1899), XII, pp. 5-9.

22. Rudyard Kipling, ‘Among the Railway Folk’, Works, 15 vols. (New York: Lovell, 1899), VII, pp. 65-93.

Part 4: Anglo-Indian Junctions

23. Rabindranath Tagore, ‘A Journey with My Father’, in My Reminiscences (London: Macmillan, 1917), pp. 77-81, 86-87.

24. Fanny Bullock Workman and William Hunter Workman, Through Town and Jungle: Fourteen Thousand Miles A-Wheel among the Temples and People of the Indian Plain (London: T. F. Unwin, 1904), pp. 6, 48, 63-64, 66, 102, 204-207, 226.

25. Walter Del Mar, The Romantic East: Burma, Assam, & Kashmir (London: A. and C. Black, 1906), pp. 106-110.

26. Robert Maitland Brereton, Reminiscences of an Old English Civil Engineer, 1858-1908 (Portland, Ore.: Irwin-Hodson, 1908), pp. 11-16.

27. C. O. Burge, The Adventures of a Civil Engineer: Fifty Years on Five Continents (London: Alston Rivers, 1909), pp. 73-74, 98-101.

28. Frank A. Swettenham, The Real Malay: Pen Pictures, Second ed. (London: John Lane, 1907), pp. 37-42.

29. Malcolm Watson, The Prevention of Malaria in the Federated Malay States, Preface by Ronald Ross (Liverpool: Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, 1911), pp. 111, 121, 134.

Part 5: Colonial Railways: Third-Class Passengers, Famine, and the Drain

30. John L. Stoddard, Lectures, Ten vols. (Boston: Balch, 1899), IV, India, pp. 23-24.

31. Mahatma Gandhi, Third-Class in Indian Railways (Lahore: Gandhi Publications League, 1917), pp. 3-7.

32. ‘Third-Class Passenger Complaints and Indian Pilgrims’, from East India Railway Committee, 1920-21. Report of the Committee Appointed by the Secretary of State for India to Enquire into the Administration and Working of Indian Railways. Vol. I. (London: His Majesty’s Stationary Office for the India Office, n. d.), pp. 54-55.

33. M. Gandhi, ‘The Question of Real Convenience’, Young India 2, 8, February 25, 1920, pp. 1-2.

34. ‘Treatment of Indians Abroad’, Young India 2, 44, November 3, 1920, 7.

35. M. Gandhi, ‘Carping Criticism’, Young India 3, 19, May 11, 1921, 146.

36. Sir Richard Temple, The Bengal Famine (1874)’, in The Story of My Life, 2 vols. (London: Cassell, 1896), I, pp. 229-248.

37. Vaughan Nash, The Great Famine and Its Causes (London: Longmans, Green, 1900), pp. 12-13, 102-104, 110-114, 144-152, 163-165, 175-182, 229.

38. Romesh Chunder Dutt, Open Letters to Lord Curzon on Famine and Land Assessments in India (London: K. Paul, Trench, Trübner, 1900), pp. 124-125, 305, 314-315.

39. Dadabhai Naoroji, Poverty and Un-British Rule in India (London: S. Sonnenschein & Co., 1901), pp. 193-196, 227-229.

Part 6: Railways and the Spread of Epidemic Disease

40. R. Senior White, ‘Studies in Malaria as it Affects Railways’, Railway Board Technical Paper 258 (Part I), (Reprint, Indian Medical Gazette, LXII (Calcutta: Government of India, 1928), 55-59.

41. J. A. Sinton, ‘The Effects of Malaria on Railways’, Records of the Malaria Survey of India 5, 4 (December 1935), 471-476.

42. R. Nathan, The Plague in India, 1896, 1897, 4 vols. (Simla: Government Central Printing Office, 1898), I, pp. 291-297.

43. James Knighton Condon, ‘Railway Inspection’, The Bombay Plague, Being a History of the Progress of Plague in the Bombay Presidency from September 1896 to June 1899 (Bombay: Education Society, 1900), pp. 141-146.

Part 7: Railways and Crime

44. L. F. Morshead. Report on the Police Administration in the Bengal Presidency (Calcutta: Bengal Secretariat Book Depot, 1907), pp. 36-38.

45. S. T. Hollins, The Criminal Tribes of the United Provinces (Allahabad: Government Press, 1914), pp. 2-5, 90-94, 109-110, 115-117.

46. M. Pauparao Naidu, The History of Railway Thieves with Illustrations & Hints on Detection Fourth ed. (Madras: Higginbothams, 1915), pp. 4-19.

47. Report of the Railway Police Committee, 1921 (Simla: Government Monotype Press, 1921), pp. 2-5.

48. Abstract of Evidence Recorded by the Railway Police Committee, 1921 (Calcutta: Superintendent Government Printing, 1921), pp. i-iv, 1-8.

Part 8: The Railway as Oasis: Egypt, the Near East, and the Middle East

49. Isabella F. Romer, A Pilgrimage to the Temples and Tombs of Egypt, Nubia, and Palestine in 1845-6, 2 vols. (London: R. Bentley, 1846), pp. 98-100.

50. James Hingston, The Australian Abroad on Branches from the Main Routes Round the World (Melbourne: W. Inglis, 1885), p. 348.

51. C. F. Gordon Cumming, Via Cornwall to Egypt (London: Chatto & Windus, 1885), pp. 102-104.

52. Hadji Khan (Gazanfar Ali), Armin Vamberry and Wilfrid Sparroy, With the Pilgrims to Mecca (London: J. Lane, 1905), pp. 83-84, 87.

53. Norma Lorimer, By the Waters of Egypt (London: Methuen, 1909), pp. 1-3, 425-427.

54. E. L. Butcher, Egypt as We Know It (London: Mills & Bonn, 1911), pp. 6-16, 22-23, 153-155.

55. E. L. Butcher, Things Seen in Egypt (London: Seeley, Service and Co., 1914), pp. 177-178.

56. Francis E. Clark and Harriet E. Clark, Our Journey around the World (Hartford, Conn.: A. D. Worthington, 1896), pp. 377-380, 383-389.

57. Louisa Jebb Wilkins, By Desert Ways to Baghdad (London: T. Nelson & Sons, [1912]), pp. 55-87.

Part 9: Railways and the Re-Partitioning of British Africa

58. Thomas Joseph Willans, The Abyssinian Railway (London: 1870), pp. 163-176.

59. Rudyard Kipling, The Light that Failed, in Works, 15 vols. (New York: Lovell, 1899), III, pp. 296-303.

60. Annie Brassey, The Last Voyage: 1887 (London: Longmans, Green, 1889), pp. 435-437.

61. Frank Vincent, Actual Africa; or, The Coming Continent (New York: D. Appleton & Co., 1895), pp. 208-210, 295-296, 298-306, 312-314, 376-379, 414-415, 419-428.

62. Henry M. Stanley, Through South Africa (London: Sampson Low, Marston, 1898), pp. 4-19, 22-23, 76-79.

63. Joseph Conrad, ‘Heart of Darkness’, in Youth, and Two Other Stories (New York: McClure, Phillips & Co., 1903), pp. 71-80. Originally published in Blackwoods Magazine 165, 1,000-1,002 (February, March, and April 1899), 193-220, 479-502, 634-657.

64. Lions. The Spectator, March 3, 1900, 307-308.

65. J. H. Patterson, The Man-Eaters of Tsavo and Other East African Adventures (London: Macmillan and Co., 1910), pp. 61-74.

66. C. O. Burge, The Adventures of a Civil Engineer: Fifty Years on Five Continents (London: Alston Rivers, 1909), pp. 154-155.

67. Charlotte Mansfield, Via Rhodesia: A Journey through Southern Africa (London: S. Paul, [1911]), pp. 161-168.

68. John R. Raphael, Through Unknown Nigeria (London: T. W. Laurie, [1914]), pp. 43-53, 130-138.

Part 10: Australiana and Aborigines: Possession and Dispossession

69. Figure 2, Samuel Calvert, Engraving, ‘Skipton Jacky Jacky and His Tribe at the Opening of the Beaufort Railway’, September 7, 1874.

70. Figure 3, Eastern Excursionists. The Early Morning Train at Spencer Street Station (Melbourne, Victoria), May 4, 1881.

71. James Hingston. The Australian Abroad on Branches from the Main Routes Round the World (Melbourne: W. Inglis, 1885), pp. viii-ix, 151-153.

72. Hume Nisbet, A Colonial Tramp: Travels and Adventures in Australia and New Zealand 2 vols. (London: Ward & Downey, 1891), pp. 166-172, 233-234, 274-276.

73. May Vivienne, Sunny South Australia (Adelaide, Australia: Husse & Gillingham, 1908), pp. 299, 301, 303, 305-312, 314, 316-318.

74. May Vivienne, Travels in Western Australia,Second ed. (London: W. Heinemann, 1902), pp. 325-326, 329-330.

75. Robert Watson, Queensland Transcontinental Railway. Field Notes and Reports (Melbourne: W. H. Williams, 1883), pp. 85-86.

76. Mark Twain, More Tramps Abroad, Third ed. (London: Chatto & Windus, 1898), pp. 201-206.

77. Annie Brassey, The Last Voyage: 1887 (London: Longmans, Green, 1889), pp. 233-239.

78. Julius M. Price, The Land of Gold (London: S. Low, Marston & Company, 1896), pp. 15-21, 23-24.

79. Albert Frederick Calvert, My Fourth Tour in Western Australia (London: W. Heinemann, 1897), pp. 4, 6, 8.

80. Daisy Bates, The Passing of the Aborigines: A Lifetime Spent among the Natives of Australia. London: John Murray, 1938), pp. 163-164, 168-171, 190-192, 194-195, 207-208.

81. Anthony Trollope, Australia and New Zealand (Leipzig: B. Tauchnitz, 1873), pp. 210-213, 222-224.

About the Editor

Matthew Esposito is Professor of History at Drake University, USA

Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
HIS000000
HISTORY / General
HIS037060
HISTORY / Modern / 19th Century