Act Approach:The Use of Suggestion for Intergrated Learning  book cover
SAVE
$14.99
1st Edition

Act Approach:The Use of Suggestion for Intergrated Learning





  • This format is currently out of stock.
ISBN 9782881245565
Published January 1, 1992 by Routledge
218 Pages

 
SAVE ~ $14.99
was $74.95
USD $59.96

Prices & shipping based on shipping country


Preview

Book Description

This edition represents a thorough reworking, expansion and updating of an earlier work, distributed in manuscript from under the title Acquisition through Creative Teaching (ACT). This book is written for teachers, that is, for a wide range of professional communicators and facilitators of learning. It is designed as a practical guide for teachers who wish to learn how to use the art of suggestion to help students tap remarkable brain capacities.

Table of Contents

Preface -- Acknowledgements -- CHAPTER: THE BRAIN AS BACKGROUND -- Right Brain/Left Brain -- The Theory of Leslie Hart -- CHAPTER 2: THE CONTRIBUTION OF LOZANOV -- The Mental Reserve Capacities -- The Limiting Social Suggestive Norms -- The Key Principles of Suggestology -- The Rok of Suggestion -- The Anti-Suggestive Barriers -- Lozanov’s Means of Suggestion -- Authority -- A Childlike State -- Pseudopassiviiy -- Doubleplaneness -- Peripheral Stimuli -- Lozanov’sSuggestopedia -- The Means of Lozanov’s Suggeslopedia -- CHAPTER 3: LANGUAGE ACQUISITION! -- LANGUAGE LEARNING -- The Pioneering Work of Krashen, Asher and Terrell -- The Work of Stephen Krashen -- Krashen’s Five Hypotheses -- Two Successful Models for Second Language Acquisition -- The Total Physical Response Approach (TPR) -- The Natural Approach -- CHAPTER 4: THE ACT MODEL OF ACCELERATIVE, FULL-SPECTRUM LEARNING -- Overview -- Bridging Conscious and Subconscious Elements -- The Role of Suggestion -- The Role of the Physical Environment -- The Role of the Teacher -- CHAPTER 5: SOME “HOW-TO’S” OF SUGGESTION -- Meditation and/or Centering Techniques -- Visualization Techniques -- Rapport-Building Techniques -- Acknowledging Eyes -- Voice Intonation -- Body Presence -- Entrainment: Our Intimate Dance of Communication -- How WeDress -- CHAPTER 6: THE EVOCATIVE POWER OF WORDS Speaking to the Whole Person -- Words as Catalysts -- Words for Seeing and Hearing and Feeling -- The Use of Metaphors -- A Guided Fantasy Recalling a Positive Learning Experience -- TempoinGuidingFantasies -- Degree of Directiveness -- Embedded Suggestions -- Embedding Direct Suggestions -- Anchonng -- The Stoiy as Metaphor -- Commentary -- Pacing -- Leading -- Positively Suggestive Language and Images -- Positive Inter-Personal Relations and Group Interaction -- Renewed Doubt and Challenge -- Future Pacing -- Name Symbolin -- CHAPTER 7: GET11NG STARTED RIGHT -- Crucial First Impressions -- Before the Course Begins -- The First Day of Class -- TheRoom -- General Arrangement -- Purposeful Use of Visual and Peripheral Stimuli -- Student Sealing -- First Contact -- Non-Verbal Messages -- Opening Welcome -- Grades and Dispelling Fear of Failure -- Invitation into a New Language -- Invitation to Play: Assuming aFanlasy Identity -- Language through Actions: An Initial Semi-Silent Period -- CHAPTER 8: THE ACT TEXT -- Main Features -- Commcreial Texts -- Supplementary Materials for Grammar and Practice -- CHAPTER 9: MUSIC AND THE PRESENTATION OF MATERIAL -- The Role of Music -- Background Music before Class and during Breaks -- Background Support for Guided Fantasies and Relaxations -- Songs: Folksongs, Popular Songs, Classical Art Songs, and Fol.kdances -- General Background Music: To Use or Not to Use -- The Presentation of New Material: Musical, Relaxed. Global and Multi-Modal -- The Global Prelude -- The Concert Presentations -- The First or Active Concert -- ‘The Second orPassive Concert -- CHAFFER 10: THE ACTIVATION PHASES -- Retrieving and Using What Is Learned -- Activation Is More Than Speech Production -- Setting the Stage for Easy Activation -- Puppets and Rapport -- Primary Activation Activities -- Whole Group Choral Echo/Antics -- Role Reading in Diads or Triads -- Individual or Small Group Role Reading -- Ccwnprehension Check -- Secondary Activation Activities -- Appealtothelmagtnauo -- Using Props -- Singing. Miming and Dancing -- Drama*izations -- Games -- The Accelerative Snowball Effect -- CHAPTER 11: ERROR CORRECTION, GRAMMAR ANDHOMEWORK -- Error Correction -- TheRole of Grammar -- Homework -- CHAFFER 12: DOCUMENTED RESULTS I -- The ACT Courses at the University ol Massacbusetts at Boston -- ACT German Courses at the University of Massachusetts at Boston -- ACT German: Level I -- Students -- ClassForrnat -- Method -- Physical Setting -- Instructional Materials -- Credits -- Grades -- Requirements -- EvaluationandTesting -- Video Taping and Outside Observers -- The Students Own Post-Course Evaluations -- Testing -- Conclusions -- ACT German: Level II -- Rationale -- Level 2 Objectives -- Students -- Class Format and Facilities -- Melhod -- Materials -- Credits, Grades and Requirements -- Evaluation, Testing, and Results -- Standardized Testing -- Video Taped Drama Peiformance -- Conclusions -- CHAPTER 13: THE ACT APPROACH FOR THE US. ARMY -- A Documented Experiment -- Background -- Purpose -- Objectives -- Description of Course -- Student Selection -- Language Background -- Tablel -- Disparity in Linguistic Background -- Pre-Testing -- Course Format -- Course Materials -- The Instructional Environment -- Physical Setting -- Psychological Setting and Psychological Means -- First Contact -- Guiding the Emerging Group Dynamics -- First Day of Class -- Establishing Rapport -- Integrating the Total Physical Response Approach (TPR) -- The Use of Music -- Activation Techniques: From Skits to Formal Briefings -- ATypicalDayinCbss -- The Snowball Effect of Success -- CourseEvaluation -- Procedures and Tests -- The Defense Language Proficiency Test (DLPT) -- A Special Task Oral Eram (STO) -- Scoring -- Listening and Reading -- Speaking -- ResultsandDiscussion -- Table 2 -- Discussion -- DLPT Listening Comprehension -- DLPT Reading -- STO Listening -- STO Speaking -- Other -- Comparing the Experimental Course with Regular Devens Geniian Courses -- Comparing the Achievement of Course Objectives -- Table3 -- Comparing DLPT Scores -- Table 4 -- Discussion -- CHAPTER 14: TESTING -- Some Personal Thoughts on Its Use and Abuse -- Testing to Demonstrate Course Effectiveness -- Other Ways of Knowing about Course Effectiveness -- Testing and Homework to Produce Grades -- An Expenment with More Homework and Tests -- Some Concluding Thoughts on Our Obsession with Testing -- APPENDICES -- Appendix 1: ACT Text Exceipt -- Appendix 2: Activation Ideas -- Appendix 3: ACTFL Provisional Proficiency Guidelines -- Appendix 4: Defense Language Institute (DLI) Skill Level Descriptions -- REFERENCES -- BIBLIOGRAPHY.

...
View More

Author(s)

Biography

Lynn Dhority University of Massachusetts Boston, USA.