Africa in the Age of Globalisation : Perceptions, Misperceptions and Realities book cover
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Africa in the Age of Globalisation
Perceptions, Misperceptions and Realities




ISBN 9781472436696
Published March 28, 2015 by Routledge
312 Pages

 
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Book Description

This is a collection of bold and visionary scholarship that reveals an insightful exposition of re-visioning African development from African perspectives. It provides educators, policy makers, social workers, non-governmental agencies, and development agencies with an interdisciplinary conceptual base that can effectively guide them in planning and implementing programs for socio-economic development in Africa. The book provides up-to-date scholarly research on continental trends on various subjects and concerns of paramount importance to globalisation and development in Africa (politics, democracy, education, gender, technology, global relationships and the role of non-governmental organisations). The authors challenge the familiar paradigms in order to show how imperfectly, if at all, assumptions about globalisation and development theories have failed in their depictions and applications to Africa. The scholars in this volume both inform and advocate for a re-visioning of perceptions on Africa and how it navigates global processes.

Author(s)

Biography

Professor Edward Shizha is a sociologist in education and teaches courses in contemporary studies and youth and children’s studies at Wilfrid Laurier University in Brantford in Canada. His academic and research interests are in Africanisation of education in Africa, contemporary educational problems, globalization, post-colonialism, and indigenous knowledges. He has authored, co-authored and co-edited 6 books and has several peer-reviewed journal articles to his credit. Professor Lamine Diallo is a sociologist who is involved in community development research in Canada and Africa. He is a founding member of the Tshepo Institute for the Study of Contemporary Africa at Wilfrid Laurier University in Brantford in Canada. His teaching and research is in the areas of power, organizational leadership governance and democratization with a special focus on Africa. Prof. Diallo has been involved in several international development projects in the African continent including Benin, Senegal, Congo and Guinee.

Reviews

’This book, anchored by a critical reading of historical and contemporary globalisation, analyses and reiterates the essential conditions for Africa’s development agenda. Drawing from local, regional and global contexts, the study rightfully reveals the significance of human agency and the institutional prerequisites for social development in a bold and refreshing manner.’ Korbla P. Puplampu, Grant MacEwan University, Canada ’Africa in the Age of Globalisation offers a most lucid, insightful and a very interesting account on challenges and possibilities of African development in the context of globalisation. The book should be a good read for all who truly care about African development. The multidisciplinary gaze on African development and the highlights on both the possibilities and limitations of current globalising encounters render this work a fitting place among cutting edge scholarship on Africa. There are significant lessons for readers interested in understanding what current processes of globalisation pose for Africa in terms of the complexities, contentions and contradictions, as well as, hopes and desires of a genuine African-defined and locally-determined development.’ George J. Sefa Dei, University of Toronto, Canada '... it is befitting to congratulate the editors and their team for producing a text which represents a very strong statement regarding the position of Africa in the age of globalisation. Without any reservations, the text is a must read for several groups of people including university students in the social sciences, policy makers, government leaders, development practitioners, and to all who value and wish to live in a better Africa.' Journal of Economics Bibliography