1st Edition

Ancient Egypt
Foundations of a Civilization





ISBN 9780582772533
Published November 28, 2005 by Routledge
232 Pages

USD $56.95

Prices & shipping based on shipping country


Preview

Book Description

Ancient Egypt is a beautifully illustrated, easy-to-read book covering the formative era of the Egyptian civilization: the age before the pyramids. Douglas Brewer shows why an awareness of the earliest phase of Egyptian history is crucial to understanding of later Egyptian culture.  Beginning with a quick review of the fields of Egyptology and archaeology, Ancient Egypt takes the reader on a compelling survey of Egypt's prehistoric past.  The books tours the Nile Valley to explore its impact on all aspects of life, from day-to-day living to regional politics, and introduces the reader to the Nile Valley's earliest inhabitants and the very first "Egyptians".

 

Table of Contents

1.Archaeology, Egyptology and Prehistory: How We Know What We Know  2. Archaeology and Egyptian Prehistory  3. Environmental Reflections  4. The Paleolithic: A Desert in Bloom  5. The Neolithic: An Agricultural Revolution and New Way of Life  6. The Predynastic Period: Egypt in its Infancy  7. The Late Predynastic: Naqada III and the Quest for Power  8. In Search of Egypt's First Pharoah  9. Early Dynastic Life  10. New Horizons

 

...
View More

Author(s)

Biography

Douglas J Brewer is a Professor of Anthropology at the University of Illinois and Director of the Spurlock Museum. He has written many books including the bestselling Egypt and the Egyptians and articles on Egypt. He has also spent 20 years involved in fieldwork projects in Egpyt - from the eastern desert to the Nile Valley.

Reviews

'...this is a most welcome book, which will fill a gap in the study of early Egypt... The author...has sprinkled his narrative with anecdotes from his own archaoelogical expeditions make the text lively and entertaining, elevating his book from mere description to a highly personal and approachable account. I highly recommend it.' -  Ronald Leprohon, Professor of Egyptology, University of  Toronto