Asia Pacific Security: 1st Edition (Hardback) book cover

Asia Pacific Security

1st Edition

Edited by Leszek Buszynski

Routledge

1,819 pages

Purchasing Options:$ = USD
Hardback: 9780415828802
pub: 2014-07-07
SAVE ~$318.00
$1590.00
$1272.00
x

FREE Standard Shipping!

Description

This new title from Routledge, edited by Professor Leszek Buszynski, includes the key literature on Asia Pacific Security. Arranged across four volumes, the collection covers China, the United States, Japan, and South Korea, as well as peripheral players such as Australia and India. It explores in depth trouble spots and potential flashpoints, for example, Taiwan and the Korean Peninsula. It also brings together the major works on regional security architecture and non-traditional security.

Reviews

"The four volume series will certainly serve as a very good reference for libraries. Moreover, they can be used by researchers and advanced students as great source books for almost any analysis of contemporary Asia from the perspective of International Relations. Indeed, the great appeal of the chapters included in the four volumes will be to audiences rooted in policy sciences, area studies or theoretical IR. In addition, since the essays can be assigned individually the volumes can be an excellent basis for assignation of text in courses and seminars."

Eyal Ben-Ari, Kinneret Academic College, East Asia Integration Studies

Table of Contents

Volume I: The great powers

Part 1: Power Transition and a Rising China

1. David Rapkin and William R. Thompson, ‘Power Transition, Challenge and the (Re)emergence of China’, International Interactions, 2003, 29, 4, 315–42.

2. Robert S. Ross, ‘The Geography of the Peace: East Asia in the Twenty-First Century’, International Security, 1999, 23, 4, 81–118.

3. Robert S. Ross, ‘China’s Naval Nationalism: Sources, Prospects, and the U.S. Response’, International Security, 2009, 34, 2, 46–81.

4. William A. Callahan, ‘China’s Strategic Futures’, Asian Survey, 2013, 52, 4, 617–42.

5. Randall L. Schweller and Xiaoyu Pu, ‘After Unipolarity: China’s Visions of International Order in an Era of U.S. Decline’, International Security, 2011, 36, 1, 41–72.

6. David Shambaugh, ‘Coping with a Conflicted China’, Washington Quarterly, 2011, 34, 1, 7–27.

7. David Shambaugh, ‘Chinese Hegemony over East Asia by 2015?’, Korean Journal of Defense Analysis, 1997, 9, 1, 7–28.

8. Jonathan Holslag, ‘Embracing China’s Global Security Ambitions’, Washington Quarterly, 2009, 32, 3, 105–18.

9. Andrew Scobell and Andrew J. Nathan, ‘China’s Overstretched Military’, Washington Quarterly, 2012, 35, 4, 135–48.

Part 2: The US, China, and the American Alliance System

10. Robert J. Art, ‘The United States and the Rise of China: Implications for the Long Haul’, Political Science Quarterly, 2010, 125, 3, 359–91.

11. Joseph Nye, ‘American and Chinese Power After the Financial Crisis’, Washington Quarterly, 2010, 33, 4, 143–53.

12. Thomas J. Christensen, ‘China, the U.S.–Japan Alliance, and the Security Dilemma in East Asia’, International Security, 1992, 23, 4, 49–80.

13. Thomas J. Christensen, ‘Fostering Stability or Creating a Monster? The Rise of China and U.S. Policy Toward East Asia’, International Security, 2006, 31, 1, 81–126.

14. Michael Beckley, ‘China’s Century? Why America’s Edge Will Endure’, International Security, 2011/12, 36, 3, 41–78.

15. Jae Jeok Park, ‘The US-Led Alliances in the Asia-Pacific: Hedge Against Potential Threats or an Undesirable Multilateral Security Order?’, Pacific Review, 2011, 24, 2, 137–58.

Volume II: Japan, South Korea, and the peripheral players

Part 1: A Reviving Japan

16. Tsuyoshi Sunohara, ‘The Anatomy of Japan’s Shifting Security Orientation’, Washington Quarterly, 2010, 33, 4, 39–57.

17. Keiko Hirata, ‘Who Shapes the National Security Debate? Divergent Interpretations of Japan’s Security Role’, Asian Affairs: An American Review, 2008, 35, 3, 123–51.

18. Yasuhiro Izumikawa, ‘Explaining Japanese Antimilitarism: Normative and Realist Constraints on Japan’s Security Policy’, International Security, 2010, 35, 2, 123–60.

19. Wada Shuichi, ‘Article Nine of the Japanese Constitution and Security Policy: Realism Versus Idealism in Japan Since the Second World War’, Japan Forum, 2010, 22, 3–4, 405–431.

20. Daiki Shibuichi, ‘The Yasukuni Shrine Dispute and the Politics of Identity in Japan: Why All the Fuss?’, Asian Survey, 2005, 45, 2, 197–215.

21. Christopher W Hughes, ‘Japan’s Military Modernisation: A Quiet Japan-China Arms Race and Global Power Projection’, Asia-Pacific Review, 2009, 16, 1, 84–99.

22. Christopher W. Hughes, ‘"Super-Sizing" the DPRK Threat: Japan’s Evolving Military Posture and North Korea’, Asian Survey, 2009, 49, 2, 291–311.

23. Mike M. Mochizuki, ‘Japan’s Shifting Strategy Toward the Rise of China’, Journal of Strategic Studies, 2007, 30, 4–5, 739–76.

24. Caroline Rose, ‘Managing China: Risk and Risk Management in Japan’s China Policy’, Japan Forum, 2010, 22, 1–2, 149–68.

Part 2: South Korea

25. Chang-hee Nam, ‘Relocating the U.S. Forces in South Korea: Strained Alliance, Emerging Partnership in the Changing Defense Posture’, Asian Survey, 2006, 46, 4, 615–31.

26. Chang Hun Oh and Celeste Arrington, ‘Democratization and Changing Anti-American Sentiments in South Korea’, Asian Survey, 2007, 47, 2, 327–50.

27. Roland Bleiker, ‘Identity and Security in Korea’, Pacific Review, 2001, 14, 1, 121–48.

28. Gilbert Rozman, ‘South Korea and Sino-Japanese Rivalry: A Middle Power’s Options Within the East Asian Core Triangle’, Pacific Review, 2007, 20, 2, 197–220.

Part 3: Australia, India

29. C. Raja Mohan, ‘Rising India: Partner in Shaping the Global Commons?’, Washington Quarterly, 2010, 33, 3, 133–48.

30. Francine R. Frankel, ‘The Breakout of China-India Strategic Rivalry in Asia and the Indian Ocean’, Journal of International Affairs, 2011, 64, 2, 1–17.

31. Nitya Singh, ‘How to Tame Your Dragon: An Evaluation of India’s Foreign Policy Toward China’, India Review, 2012, 11, 3, 139–60.

32. Ann Capling, ‘Twenty Years of Australia’s Engagement with Asia’, Pacific Review, 2008, 21, 5, 601–22.

33. James Manicom and Andrew O’Neil, ‘Accommodation, Realignment, or Business as Usual? Australia’s Response to a Rising China’, Pacific Review, 2010, 23, 1, 23–44.

Volume III: Trouble spots and potential flashpoints

Part 1: The Korean Peninsula

34. Christopher W. Hughes, ‘North Korea’s Nuclear Weapons: Implications for the Nuclear Ambitions of Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan’, Asia Policy, 2007, 3, 75–104.

35. Marcus Noland, ‘Why North Korea Will Muddle Through’, Foreign Affairs, 1997, 76, 4, 105–18.

36. Victor D. Cha and Nicholas D. Anderson, ‘A North Korean Spring?’, Washington Quarterly, 2012, 35, 1, 7–24.

37. Michael O’Hanlon and Mike Mochizuki, ‘Toward a Grand Bargain with North Korea’, Washington Quarterly, 2003, 26, 4, 7–18.

38. Daniel Byman and Jennifer Lind, ‘Pyongyang’s Survival Strategy: Tools of Authoritarian Control in North Korea’, International Security, 2010, 35, 1, 44–74.

39. Bruce W. Bennett and Jennifer Lind, ‘The Collapse of North Korea: Military Missions and Requirements’, International Security, 2011, 36, 2, 84–119.

40. Benjamin Habib, ‘North Korea’s Nuclear Weapons Programme and the Maintenance of the Songun System’, Pacific Review, 2011, 24, 1, 43–64.

41. Jae Ho Chung and Myung-hae Choi, ‘Uncertain Allies or Uncomfortable Neighbors? Making Sense of China–North Korea Relations, 1949–2010’, Pacific Review, 2013, 26, 3, 243–64.

42. Wade L. Huntley, ‘U.S. Policy Toward North Korea in Strategic Context: Tempting Goliath’s Fate’, Asian Survey, 2007, 47, 3, 455–80.

43. Gilbert Rozman, ‘The North Korean Nuclear Crisis and U.S. Strategy in Northeast Asia’, Asian Survey, 2007, 47, 4, 601–21.

44. Bonnie S. Glaser and Wang Liang, ‘North Korea: The Beginning of a China-U.S. Partnership?’, Washington Quarterly, 2008, 31, 3, 165–80.

Part 2: Maritime Disputes

45. Mark J. Valencia, ‘The East China Sea Dispute: Context, Claims, Issues, and Possible Solutions’, Asian Perspective, 2007, 31, 1, 127–67.

46. Min Gyo Koo, ‘The Senkaku/Diaoyu Dispute and Sino-Japanese Political-Economic Relations: Cold Politics and Hot Economics?’, Pacific Review, 2009, 22, 2, 205–32.

47. John W. Garver, ‘China’s Push Through the South China Sea: The Interaction of Bureaucratic and National Interests’, China Quarterly, 1992, 132, 999–1028.

48. Rodolfo C. Severino, ‘ASEAN and the South China Sea’, Security Challenges, 2010, 6, 2, 37–47.

49. Sarah Raine, ‘Beijing’s South China Sea Debate’, Survival, 2011, 53, 5, 69–88.

50. Leszek Buszynski, ‘The South China Sea: Oil, Maritime Claims, and U.S.-China Strategic Rivalry’, Washington Quarterly, 2012, 35, 2, 139–56.

Part 3: Taiwan

51. Steve Tsang, ‘The U.S. Military and American Commitment to Taiwan’s Security’, Asian Survey, 2012, 52, 4, 777–97.

52. Nancy Bernkopf Tucker, ‘If Taiwan Chooses Unification, Should the United States Care?’, Washington Quarterly, 2002, 25, 3, 15–28.

Volume IV: Regional security architecture and non-traditional security

Part 1: Regional Security Architecture

53. Amitav Acharya, ‘A Concert of Asia’, Survival, 1999, 41, 3, 84–101.

54. Barry Buzan, ‘Security Architecture in Asia: The Interplay of Regional and Global Levels, Pacific Review, 2003, 16, 2, 143–73.

55. T. J. Pempel, ‘Soft Balancing, Hedging, and Institutional Darwinism: The Economic-Security Nexus and East Asian Regionalism’, Journal of East Asian Studies, 2010, 10, 209–38.

56. Takashi Terada, ‘The Origins of ASEAN+6 and Japan’s Initiatives: China’s Rise and the Agent–Structure Analysis’, Pacific Review, 2010, 23, 1, 71–92.

57. Derek Mcdougall, ‘Asia-Pacific Security Regionalism: The Impact of Post-1997 Developments’, Contemporary Security Policy, 2002, 23, 2, 113–34.

58. Amitav Acharya, ‘Ideas, Identity, and Institution-Building: From the "ASEAN Way" to the "Asia-Pacific Way"?’, Pacific Review, 1997, 10, 3, 319–46.

59. David Martin Jones and M. L. R. Smith, ‘Making Process, Not Progress: ASEAN and the Evolving East Asian Regional Order’, International Security, 2007, 32, 1, 148–84.

60. Sheldon W. Simon, ‘Evaluating Track II Approaches to Security Diplomacy in the Asia-Pacific: The CSCAP Experience’, Pacific Review, 2002, 15, 2, 167–200.

61. Sheldon W. Simon, ‘Security Prospects in Southeast Asia: Collaborative Efforts and the ASEAN Regional Forum, Pacific Review, 1998, 11, 2, 195–212.

Part 2: Shanghai Co-operation Organization

63. Stephen Aris, ‘The Shanghai Cooperation Organisation: "Tackling the Three Evils". A Regional Response to Non-Traditional Security Challenges or an Anti-Western Bloc?’, Europe-Asia Studies, 2009, 61, 3, 457–82.

64. Zhao Huasheng, ‘The Shanghai Cooperation Organization at 5: Achievements and Challenges Ahead’, China and Eurasia Forum Quarterly, 2006, 4, 3, 105–23.

Part 3: Non-Traditional Security

65. Natasha Hamilton-Hart, ‘War and Other Insecurities in East Asia: What the Security Studies Field Does and Does Not Tell Us’, Pacific Review, 2009, 22, 1, 49–71.

66. Alexander Klimburg, ‘Mobilising Cyber Power, Survival: Global Politics and Strategy’, Survival, 2011, 53, 1, 41–60.

67. David Arase, ‘Non-Traditional Security in China-ASEAN Cooperation: The Institutionalization of Regional Security Cooperation and the Evolution of East Asian Regionalism’, Asian Survey, 2010, 50, 4, 808–33.

68. Mely Caballero-Anthony, ‘Non-Traditional Security and Infectious Diseases in ASEAN: Going Beyond the Rhetoric of Securitization to Deeper Institutionalization’, Pacific Review, 2008, 21, 4, 507–25.

69. Ralf Emmers, ‘ASEAN and the Securitization of Transnational Crime in Southeast Asia’, Pacific Review, 2003, 16, 3, 419–38.

70. Lorraine Elliott, ‘Transnational Environmental Crime in the Asia Pacific: An "Un(der)securitized" Security Problem?’, Pacific Review, 2001, 20, 4, 499–522.

About the Series

Critical Concepts in Asian Studies

The Critical Concepts in Asian Studies series covers a number of areas of interest to students and scholars of this popular field. The series includes titles within Asian History, Asian Politics and Asian Culture. The two newest titles in the series cover the Social Tranformation in China, as well as the issues surrounding gender in historical and contemporary Japan.

Learn more…

Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
SOC008000
SOCIAL SCIENCE / Ethnic Studies / General