Contemporary Jewish Writing : Austria After Waldheim book cover
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Contemporary Jewish Writing
Austria After Waldheim





ISBN 9781138377134
Published August 9, 2018 by Routledge
256 Pages

 
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Book Description

This book examines Jewish writers and intellectuals in Austria, analyzing filmic and electronic media alongside more traditional publication formats over the last 25 years. Beginning with the Waldheim affair and the rhetorical response by the three most prominent members of the survivor generation (Leon Zelman, Simon Wiesenthal and Bruno Kreisky) author Andrea Reiter sets a complicated standard for ‘who is Jewish’ and what constitutes a ‘Jewish response.’ She reformulates the concepts of religious and secular Jewish cultural expression, cutting across gender and Holocaust studies. The work proceeds to questions of enacting or performing identity, especially Jewish identity in the Austrian setting, looking at how these Jewish writers and filmmakers in Austria ‘perform’ their Jewishness not only in their public appearances and engagements but also in their works. By engaging with novels, poems, and films, this volume challenges the dominant claim that Jewish culture in Central Europe is almost exclusively borne by non-Jews and consumed by non-Jewish audiences, establishing a new counter-discourse against resurging anti-Semitism in the media.

Table of Contents

Introduction 1. The Impact of Waldheim 2. "Jewish Places" 3. Simulation Spaces: Performing the Jew in the Text 4. Conclusions: the Chutzpah of Austrian Jews

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Author(s)

Biography

Andrea Reiter is a Reader in German in the Department of Modern Languages at the University of Southampton, UK.

Reviews

"Reiter’s carefully chosen examples and authors are appropriate to the cultural processes they illustrate. In lucid prose, this astonishingly compact book succeeds in presenting an engaging and informative study on a challenging and important topic." Dagmar C. G. Lorenz, Journal of Austrian Studies