Criminal Networks and Law Enforcement: Global Perspectives On Illegal Enterprise, 1st Edition (Hardback) book cover

Criminal Networks and Law Enforcement

Global Perspectives On Illegal Enterprise, 1st Edition

Edited by Saskia Hufnagel, Anton Moiseienko

Routledge

264 pages

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Hardback: 9780815386001
pub: 2019-08-20
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Description

This collection presents an analysis of illicit networks and discusses implications for law enforcement and crime prevention. The contributors draw on a range of methodologies and apply them to diverse international criminological settings, from illegal fishing in the Indo-Pacific to 'money mule’ networks in the Netherlands. Using a variety of examples, the book elucidates how and why criminals form networks of cooperation, and how they can be disrupted. It is expected to be of interest to those who study criminology or criminal law, as well as law enforcement practitioners.

Table of Contents

  1. ‘Introduction’ by Saskia Hufnagel and Anton Moiseienko (Queen Mary University of London, UK); Part I: Formation of Illicit Networks; 2. ‘Co-Offending in Norway: A Comparative Perspective’ by Synøve N. Andersen (Statistics Norway); 3. ‘Sticking Together Under Covertness: An Evidence of Co-Offending Partnerships in Two-Mode Covert Networks’ by Chiara Broccatelli, Martin Everett and Johan Koskinen (all – University of Manchester, UK); 4. ‘Cybercrime, Money Mules and Situational Crime Prevention: Recruitment, Motives and Involvement Mechanisms’ by E.R (Rutger) Leukfeldt (NSCR, Netherlands) and E.R. (Edward) Kleemans (VU University Amsterdam, Netherlands); Part II: Illicit Trafficking Networks; 5. ‘Nigerian Women in Transit: Understanding Cooperation in a Human Trafficking Network’ by Charlotte Baarda (University of Oxford, UK); 6. ‘Transnational Organisation of Disorganised Crime: Netnography and Open-Source Analysis of Metal Detecting and Antiquities Trafficking’ by Samuel Hardy (University of Rome, Italy and University College London, UK); 7. ‘Using Routine Activity Theory to Explain Illegal, Unregulated and Unreported Fishing in the Indo-Pacific’ by Jade Lindley and Erika Techera (both – University of Western Australia); Part III: Illicit Networks and Politics; 8. ‘Meet the In-Betweeners: Exploring the Quality and Strength of Ties in the "Mafia Capitale" Network in Rome’ by Anna Sergi (University of Essex, UK); 9. ‘Exerting Political Influence through Networks: Charting the Transnational Exploitation of Public Officials by Colombian Rebels’ by Diego Dominquez Mejia and Russell Brewer (both – Flinders University, Australia); 10. ‘The Social Organisation of Treason: Anti-Nazi Networks in the Third Reich’ by Robert R. Faulkner (University of Massachusetts Amherst, US) and Eric R. Cheney (Central Washington University, US); Part IV: Advancing the Field; 10. ‘Organised Crime Research 1985-2014: Mapping Three Decades of Research Dynamics through Social Network Analysis’ by Panos Kostakos (University of Oulu, Finland; 11. ‘Concluding Remarks’ by Saskia Hufnagel and Anton Moiseienko (Queen Mary University of London, UK);

About the Editors

Dr Saskia Hufnagel is a Senior Lecturer in Criminal Law and Co-Director of the Criminal Justice Centre (CJC) at Queen Mary University of London. She previously worked as a Research Fellow at the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Policing and Security, Griffith University, Australia, and was a Leverhulme Fellow at the University of Leeds. During the completion of her PhD she taught at the ANU College of Law and between 2009 and 2011 she held a permanent teaching position at the University of Canberra.

Anton Moiseienko holds an undergraduate degree in international law from Kiev National University, Ukraine and a Master of Law (LLM) degree from the University of Cambridge. While studying in Kiev, he worked part-time in a Ukrainian commercial law firm for two years. After the graduation from Cambridge, Anton spent two months at several barristers’ chambers in London pursuant to the Inner Temple’s Pegasus Trust Scholarship. He then commenced his PhD at QMUL having received the School of Law’s studentship.

About the Series

Transnational Criminal Justice

Transnational Criminal Justice

The concept of ‘transnational criminal justice’ has frequently been interpreted in the academic literature as ‘international criminal justice’ or ‘global criminal justice’. Many publications that use the term ‘transnational’ therefore discuss international criminal justice and international legal frameworks. Another form of studies that has developed under the umbrella of transnationality in the field of criminal law is comparative. There has hence been a move from the terminology of ‘international’, ‘global’ and ‘comparative’ criminal justice towards ‘transnational’ criminal justice.

This series considers these developments, but focuses primarily on publications that adhere to a more literal interpretation of the term ‘transnational’. The aim of the series is to provide a forum for discussion of bilateral and multilateral relationships between nations in the field of criminal justice. International law influences these relationships, but is not the focus here. Equally, to explain transnational relationships, comparative analyses are required. While incorporating comparative studies in this series, their aim is the explanation of challenges to criminal justice cooperation in bilateral or multilateral relationships.

 

Saskia Hufnagel is a qualified German legal professional and accredited specialist in criminal law. She currently works as Lecturer in Criminal Law at Queen Mary University of London. She previously worked as a Research Fellow at the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Policing and Security, Griffith University, Australia, and was a Leverhulme Fellow at the University of Leeds. Her main research areas encompass law enforcement cooperation in Asia, North America, the EU and Australasia, comparative constitutional and human rights law with a focus on terrorism legislation and emergency management and the policing of art crime. Her monograph Policing Cooperation Across Borders: Comparative Perspectives on Law Enforcement within the EU and Australia (Ashgate) was published in 2013. Saskia was awarded an LL.M. (2004) and a PhD in Law (2011) by the Australian National University.

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Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
LAW000000
LAW / General
LAW016000
LAW / Comparative
LAW026000
LAW / Criminal Law / General
SOC004000
SOCIAL SCIENCE / Criminology