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Cultural Anthropology: 101





ISBN 9781138775527
Published February 17, 2015 by Routledge
200 Pages

 
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Book Description

This concise and accessible introduction establishes the relevance of cultural anthropology for the modern world through an integrated, ethnographically informed approach. The book develops readers’ understanding and engagement by addressing key issues such as:

  • What it means to be human
  • The key characteristics of culture as a concept
  • Relocation and dislocation of peoples
  • The conflict between political, social and ethnic boundaries
  • The concept of economic anthropology

Cultural Anthropology: 101 includes case studies from both classic and contemporary ethnography, as well as a comprehensive bibliography and index. It is an essential guide for students approaching this fascinating field for the first time.

Table of Contents

Introduction 1. Diverse Humanity, Diverse Anthropology 2. Studying Culture, Practicing Culture 3. People and Things in Motion 4. Producing and Reproducing Bodies 5. Speaking and Thinking Culture 6. Working for a Living 7. Order and Border 8. Humans and Other Persons 9. We Are What We Do 10. Better Living Through Anthropology Bibliography

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Author(s)

Biography

Jack David Eller has over twenty years of teaching experience and has published several previous books in anthropology, including a full-length textbook on cultural anthropology called ‘Cultural Anthropology: Global Forces, Local Lives’ (2013) and a textbook on the anthropology of religion.

Reviews

"Cultural Anthropology: 101 is a jargon free, concise introduction to socio-cultural anthropology. The text offers a platform to a sub-discipline of anthropology, illustrating its major theories and concepts to the larger anthropological discipline and our ever-changing world. Undergraduates will discover an engaging text that offers numerous opportunities for further exploration".

Gregory R. Campbell, The University of Montana.