1st Edition

Essays on Classical Indian Dance



  • Available for pre-order. Item will ship after December 31, 2020
ISBN 9789814877473
December 31, 2020 Forthcoming by Jenny Stanford Publishing
400 Pages

USD $129.95

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Book Description

The book is a wide-ranging collection of essays on Indian classical dance. These include writings on dance appreciation, the criticism, theory and philosophy of dance, as well as some historical and light controversial articles. Also included a seminal and unique monograph on the contribution of Sanjukta Panigrahi to the development of Odissi. 

The book approaches the subject from an internationalist point of view and opens up new possibilities for the appreciation of Indian dance in the context of a global intercultural critique. In addition, it is beautifully illustrated with a number of photographs by Arun Kumar. It will enrich and provide new ways of understanding for classical Indian dance, both for the dance community and for the general reader.

Table of Contents

1. On the Means and Ends of Rasa in Classical Indian Dance  2. Classical Indian Dance as Sadhana : Some Notes Inviting Elaboration  3. The Classical Indian Dancer as Poet, Interpreter, and Poem Itself : Some Simple Comments  4. Classical Indian Dance and the ‘Western’ Rasika : a Storm in a Teacup  5. On the Principle and Significance of Pratitya Samutpada in Classical Indian Dance  6. On Nritta: the Suspended Consummation of the Tale  7. Classical Indian Dance as a Discipline of Thought  8. On the Gunghroos: Ankle-Bells of Servitude and Mastery  9. The Space Between the Notes: Heather Lewis’s Remarkable Shastric Tour de Force  10. When is the Rasika Really a Rasika?  11. On the gramma of Classical Indian Dance : a Grecian Perspective  12. Writing The Odissi Girl: a Literary Analogue for the Dance  13. The Presence of the Absent Dancer  14. The Triumph of Mylapore Gauri Amma: A Short Incursion into Dance Genetics  15. The Language of the Dancing Body in Nritta, Part One  16. The Language of the Dancing Body in Nritta, Part Two  17. Eight Unities Re-enacted in Classical Indian Dance  18. Five Ways of Dancing That Get in the Way of Dance  19. The Preservation of Classical Indian Dance in Postmodernity  20. The Tenacious Survival of Classicism in Indian Dance  21. The Humanization of Rhythm and Form in Classical Indian Dance  22. The Problem of the Pushpanjali  23. Surprised by Dance: A Glimpse into My Personal Journey  24. Classical Indian Dance is a Humanism  25. Dance, Analysis, and the Willing Suspension of Disbelief  26. The Multilocality of Classical Indian Dance  27. On the Terrible Beauty of Moksha in Odissi  28. Jayantika: Archaeology and Imagination in the Reincarnation of Odissi  29. Sanjukta Panigrahi’s Contribution to Odissi: 1944-1964  30. The Foundational Ambiguity in Classical Indian Dance  31. The Karma of Classicism in Indian Dance  32. A Note of Thanks  33. On the Dancing Feet  34. Rukmini Devi and the Devadasi Question: An Opinion  35. A Note on Sringara Rasa  36. Classical Indian Dance at the Crossroads  37. On Filming Classical Indian Dance  38. Rasa in Filmed Classical Indian Dance  39. The Ineffable in Classical Indian Dance  40. On the Movement from one Adavu to the Next  41. The Personal Approach to Dance Criticism  42. The Sanitizing and Cleansing of Bharata Natyam  43. On ‘Pseudo-Spirituality’ in Classical Indian Dance  44. On the Freedom of Odissi to be Itself  45. Why I Choose to Write about Classical Indian Dance  46. Classical Indian Dance and Social Justice Activism  47. In Search of the Basis of ‘Spirituality’ in Classical Indian Dance

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Author(s)

Biography

Donovan Roebert is the author of a number of works of fiction and nonfiction. These include The Odissi Girl, The Rose Girl of Dharamkot, The Liberators, The Gospel for Buddhists and the Dharma for Christians and The Bearing of Culture on an Inhumane Society. He taught Buddhist theory and practice from 2006 to 2011. He is also an artist whose works are sold internationally.