Femmes Fatales  book cover
SAVE
$9.39
1st Edition

Femmes Fatales





ISBN 9780415903202
Published August 22, 1991 by Routledge
324 Pages

 
SAVE ~ $9.39
was $46.95
USD $37.56

Prices & shipping based on shipping country


Preview

Book Description

In this work of feminist film criticism, Mary Ann Doane examines questions of sexual difference and knowledge in cinematic, theoretical, and psychoanalytic discourses. "Femmes Fatales" examines Freud, the female spectator, the meaning of the close-up, and the nature of stardom. Doane's analyses of such figures as Pabst's Lulu and Rita Hayworth's Gilda trace the thematics and mechanics of maskes, masquerade, and veiling, with specific attention to the form and technology of the cinema. Working through and against the intellectual frameworks of post-structuralist and psychoanalytic theory, Doane interrogates cinematic and theoretical claims to truth about women which rely on judgements about vision and its stability or instability. Reflecting the shift in conceptual priorities within feminist film theory over the last decade, "Femmes Fatales" addresses debates over female spectatorhsip, essentialism and anti-essentialism, the tensions between psychoanalysis and history, and the relations between racial and sexual difference. Doane's nuanced and original readings of the "femme fatale" in cinema illustrate confrontations between feminism, film theory and psychoanalysis. This book should be of interest to students and lecturers in women's studies, communications studies and film theory.

Table of Contents

I. THEORETICAL EXCURSIONS, II. FEMMES FA TALES, III. THE BODY OF THE AVANT-GARDE, IV. AT THE EDGES OF PSYCHOANALYSIS

...
View More

Author(s)

Biography

Mary Ann Doane (Author)

Reviews

"Doane's insights into the ways in which women's bodies become a cinematic battleground are startling and illuminating. Likewise, her lengthy essays on psychoanalysis and racial difference and on the relationship between Freudian concept of sublimation and aesthetics (both written for this volume) are lucid and provocative, challenging the assumption that both race and aesthetics lie outside the purview of psychoanalysis." -- Publishers Weekly