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Forensic Archaeology, 4-vol. set



ISBN 9781138014244
Published December 7, 2015 by Routledge
1370 Pages 157 B/W Illustrations

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Book Description

Recent years have witnessed a surge of interest in the application of archaeological knowledge and methodology to medico-legal issues. Forensic Archaeology has rapidly emerged as a vital speciality. This new four-volume collection from Routledge, assembled and introduced by a transatlantic editorial team, brings together foundational and cutting-edge major works to enable users to make sense of a vast—and rapidly growing—corpus of scholarship.

The gathered materials have been carefully selected to highlight the key issues and debates in the development and contemporary practice of Forensic Archaeology. It is certain to be welcomed as a vital one-stop research tool.

Table of Contents

Volume I: Context and History

Part 1: Forensic Archaeology: Emergence of a Discipline

  1. D. Morse, D. Crusoe and H. G. Smith, ‘Forensic Archaeology’, Journal of Forensic Sciences, 1976, 21, 2, 323-332.
  2. D. Morse, R. C. Dailey, J. Stoutamire and J. Duncan, ‘Forensic Archaeology’, in T. A.
  3. Rathburn and J. E. Buikstra (eds), Human Identification, Case Studies in Forensic

    Anthropology (Illinois: Charles C. Thomas, 1984), pp. 53-63.

  4. B. Sigler-Eisenberg, ‘Forensic Research: Expanding the Concept of Applied Archaeology’,
  5. American Antiquity, 1985, 50, 3, 650-655.

  6. J. R. Hunter, ‘A Background to Forensic Archaeology’, in J. Hunter, C. Roberts and A.
  7. Martin (eds), Studies in Crime: An Introduction to Forensic Archaeology (New York:

    Routledge, 1997), pp. 7-23.

    Part 2: Archaeological and Forensic Concepts

  8. D. G. Jones and R. J. Harris, ‘Archaeological Human Remains: Scientific, Cultural and Ethical Considerations’, Current Anthropology, 1998, 39, 2, 253-264.
  9. W. D. Haglund, ‘Archaeology and Forensic Death Investigations’, Historical Archaeology, 2001, 35, 1, 26-34.
  10. D. C. Dirkmaat, ‘Documenting Context at the Outdoor Crime Scene: Why Bother?’, in D. C. Dirkmaat (ed.), A Companion to Forensic Anthropology (London: Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 2012), pp. 48-65.
  11. D. D. Scott and M. Connor, ‘Context Delicti: Archaeological Context in Forensic Work’, in
  12. W. D. Haglund and M. H. Sorg (eds), Forensic Taphonomy, The Postmortem Fate of Human Remains (Florida: CRC Press, 1997), pp. 27-38.

  13. J. R. Hunter, M. B. Brickley, J. Bourgeois, W. Bouts, L. Bourguignon, F. Hubrecht, J. de
  14. Winne, H. van Haaster, T. Hakbijl, H. de Jong, L. Smits, L. H. van Wijngaarden, M. Luschen, ‘Forensic Archaeology, Forensic Anthropology and Human Rights in Europe’, Science and Justice, 2001, 41, 3, pp. 173-178.

  15. M. Mikellide, ‘Burial Patterns during Times of Armed Conflict in Cyprus in the 1960s and
  16. 1970s’, Journal of Forensic Sciences, 2014, 59, 5, 1184–1190.

  17. K. Oakley, ‘Forensic Archaeology and Anthropology: An Australian Perspective’, Forensic
  18. Science, Medicine, and Pathology, 2005, 1, 3, pp. 169-172. 

    Volume II: Search and Recovery

    Part 3. Search Techniques

  19. D. L. France, T. J. Griffin, J. G. Swanburg, J. W. Lindemann, G. C. Davenport, V.
  20. Trammell, C. T. Armbrust, B. Kondratieff, A. Nelson, K. Castellano and D. Hopkins, ‘A

    Multidisciplinary Approach to the Detection of Clandestine Graves’, Journal of Forensic

    Sciences, 1992, 37, 6, pp. 1435-1458.

  21. S. C. Buck, ‘Searching for Graves Using Geophysical Technology: Field Tests with Ground
  22. Penetrating Radar, Magnetrometry, and Electrical Resistivity’, Journal of Forensic Sciences, 2003, 48, 1, 5-11.

  23. J. J. Schultz, ‘Using Ground-Penetrating Radar to Locate Clandestine Graves of Homicide
  24. Victims: Forming Forensic Archaeology Partnerships with Law Enforcement’, Homicide Studies, 2007, 11, 1, 15-29.

  25. L. B. Conyers, ‘Ground-Penetrating Radar Techniques to Discover and Map Historic Graves’, Historical Archaeology, 2006, 40, 3, 64-73.
  26. G. C. Davenport, ‘Remote Sensing Applications in Forensic Investigations’, Historical
  27. Archaeology, 2001, 35, 1, 87-100.

  28. R. S. Freeland, M. L. Miller, R. E. Yoder and S. K. Koppenjan, ‘Forensic Application of
  29. FM-CW and Pulse Radar’, Journal of Environmental and Engineering Geophysics, 2003, 8,

    97-103.

    Part 4: Recovery and Documentation

  30. W. Bass and W.H. Birkby, ‘Exhumation: The Method Could Make the Difference’, FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin, 1978, 47, 7, 6-11.
  31. M. J. Cox, ‘Crime Scene Archaeology is One of the Most Frightening Areas of
  32. Archaeology in which to Practice’, The Field Archaeologist, 1995, 23, 14-16.

  33. H. Tuller and M. Duric, ‘Keeping the Pieces Together: Comparison of Mass Grave Excavation Methodology’, Forensic Science International, 2006, 156, 192-200.
  34. M. Skinner, ‘Planning the Archaeological Recovery of Evidence from Recent Mass
  35. Graves’, Forensic Science International, 1987, 34, 267-287.

  36. D. H. R. Spennemann and B. Franke, ‘Archaeological Techniques for Exhumations: A Unique Data Source for Crime Scene Investigations, Forensic Science International, 1995, 74, 1-2, 5-15.
  37. S. I. Fairgrieve, ‘Scene Recovery’, in Forensic Cremation: Recovery and Analysis (Florida:
  38. CRC Press, 2007), pp. 61-90.

  39. P. N. Cheetham and I. Hanson, ‘Excavation and Recovery in Forensic Archaeological
  40. Investigations’, in S. Blau and D. H. Ubelaker (eds), Handbook of Forensic Anthropology and Archaeology (California: Left Coast Press, 2009), pp. 141-149.

  41. S. Donnelly, M. Hedley, T. Loveless, R. Manning, A. Perman and R. Wessling, ‘Scene of crime examination’, in M. Cox, A. Flavel, I. Hanson, J. Laver and R. Wessling (eds), The Scientific Investigation of Mass Graves: Towards Protocols and Standard Operating Procedures (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2008), pp. 148-182.
  42. R. E. Johnson and P. Steur, ‘Underwater Crime Scene Investigation’, in D. Morse, J. Duncan and J. Stoutamire (eds), Handbook of Forensic Archaeology and Anthropology, (Florida: Florida State University Foundation Inc., 1983), pp. 48-73.
  43. D. H. Ubelaker, ‘Skeletal Recovery’, in Human Skeletal Remains: Excavation, Analysis, Interpretation (Washington: Taraxacum, 1999), pp. 3-43.
  44. J. R. Hunter and S. Dockrill, ‘Recovering Buried Remains’, in J. Hunter, C. Roberts and A.
  45. Martin (eds), Studies in Crime: An Introduction to Forensic Archaeology (New York:

    Routledge, 1997), pp. 40-57. 

    Volume III: General Considerations: Taphonomy, Ethics and Protocols

    Part 5: Taphonomy

  46. C. M. Nielsen-Marsh and R. E. M. Hedges, ‘Patterns of Diagenesis in Bone I: The Effects of Site Environments’, Journal of Archaeological Science, 2000, 27, 1139-1150.
  47. E. A. Carson, V. H. Stefan and J. F. Powell, ‘Skeletal Manifestations of Bear Scavenging’,
  48. Journal of Forensic Sciences, 2000, 45, 3, 515-526.

    Part 6: Ethics

  49. E. D. Williams, and J. D. Crews, ’From Dust to Dust: Ethical and Practical Issues Involved in the Location, Exhumation, and Identification of Bodies from Mass Graves’, Croatian Medical Journal, 2003, 44, 3, 251-258.
  50. Part 7: Protocols and Guidelines

  51. M. Skinner, and J. Sterenberg, ‘Turf Wars: Authority and Responsibility for the Investigation of Mass Graves’, Forensic Science International, 2005, 151, 221-232.
  52. E. Jessee and M. Skinner, ‘A Typology of Mass Grave and Mass-Grave Related Sites’,
  53. Forensic Science International, 2005, 152, 1, 55-59.

  54. M. Skinner, D. Alempijevic and M. Djuric-Srejic, ‘Guidelines for International Forensic Bio-archaeology Monitors of Mass Grave Exhumations’, Forensic Science International, 2003, 134, 2-3, 81-92.
  55. H. H. Tuller, ‘Mass Graves and Human Rights: Latest Developments, Methods and Lessons Learned’, in D. C. Dirkmaat (ed.), A Companion to Forensic Anthropology, (London: Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 2012), pp. 157-174.
  56. A. Anderson, M. Cox, A. Flavel, I. Hanson, M. Hedley, J. Laver, A. Perman, M. Viner and R.
  57. Wright, ‘Protocols for the Investigation of Mass Graves’, in M. Cox, A. Flavel, I. Hanson, J.

    Laver and R. Wessling (eds), The Scientific Investigation of Mass Graves: Towards Protocols and Standard Operating Procedures (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2008), pp. 39-105.

  58. A. Anderson, I. Hanson, D. Schofield, H. Scholtz, J. Vellema and M. Viner, ‘Health and
  59. Safety’, in M. Cox, A. Flavel, I. Hanson, J. Laver and R. Wessling (eds), The Scientific

    Investigation of Mass Graves: Towards Protocols and Standard Operating Procedures (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2008), pp. 109-147.

    Volume IV: Application

    Part 7: Contextual Diversity in Forensic Work

  60. L. M. Hoshower, ‘Forensic Archaeology and the Need for Flexible Excavation Strategies: A Case Study’, Journal of Forensic Sciences, 1998, 43, 1, 53-56.
  61. M. Cox and L. S. Bell, ‘Recovery of Human Skeletal Elements from a Recent UK Murder
  62. Inquiry: Preservational Signatures’, Journal of Forensic Sciences, 1999, 44, 5, 945-950.

  63. D. C. Nobes, ‘The Search for "Yvonne": A Case Example of the Delineation of a Grave Using Near-Surface Geophysical Methods’, Journal Forensic Sciences, 2000, 45, 3, 715-721.
  64. D. M. Glassman, ‘Love Lost and Gone Forever’, in D. Wolfe Steadman (ed.), Hard Evidence: Case Studies in Forensic Anthropology, 2nd edn (New Jersey: Prentice Hall, 2003, 2009), pp. 113-121.
  65. D. Wolfe Steadman, W. Basler, M. J. Hochrein, D. F. Klein and J. C. Goodin, ‘Domestic
  66. Homicide Investigations: An Example from the United States’, in S. Blau and D. H. Ubelaker (eds), Handbook of Forensic Anthropology and Archaeology (California: Left Coast Press, 2009), pp. 351-362.

  67. M. J. Hochrein, ‘An Autopsy of the Grave: Recognizing, Collecting, and Preserving Forensic Geotaphonomic Evidence’, in W. D. Haglund and M. H. Sorg (eds), Advances in Forensic Taphonomy. Method, Theory, and Archaeological Perspectives (Florida: CRC Press, 2002), pp. 46-70.
  68. S. T. Brooks and R. H. Brooks, ‘Problems of Burial Exhumation, Historical and Forensic
  69. Aspects’, in T. A. Rathburn and J. E. Buikstra (eds), Human Identification, Case Studies in

    Forensic Anthropology (Illinois: Charles C. Thomas, 1984), pp. 64-86.

  70. D. C. Dirkmaat and J. M. Adovasio, ‘The Role of Archaeology in the Recovery and
  71. Interpretation of Human Remains from an Outdoor Forensic Setting’, in W. D. Haglund and M. H. Sorg (eds), Forensic Taphonomy, The Postmortem Fate of Human Remains (Florida: CRC Press, 1997), pp. 39-64.

  72. R. W. Mann, B. E. Anderson, T. D. Holland and J. E. Webb Jr, ‘Unusual "Crime" Scenes:
  73. The Role of Forensic Anthropology in Recovering and Identifying American MIAs’, in D.

    Wolfe Steadman (ed.), Hard Evidence: Case Studies in Forensic Anthropology (New Jersey: Prentice Hall, 2009), pp. 133-140.

  74. N. J. Sauer, W. A. Lovis, M. E. Blumer and J. Fillion, ‘The Contributions of Archaeology and Physical Anthropology to the John McRae Case: a Trial and a Retrial’, in D. Wolfe
  75. Steadman (ed.), Hard Evidence: Case Studies in Forensic Anthropology (New Jersey:

    Prentice Hall, 2009), pp. 122-132.

  76. J. T. Pokines, ‘Forensic Recoveries of the U.S. War Dead and the Effects of Taphonomy and the Other Site-Altering Processes’, in D. Wolfe Steadman (ed.), Hard Evidence: Case Studies in Forensic Anthropology (New Jersey: Prentice Hall, 2009), pp. 141-153.
  77. P. S. Sledzik and A. W. Willcox, ‘Corpi Aquaticus: The Hardin Cemetery Flood of 1993’, in
  78. D. Wolfe Steadman (ed.), Hard Evidence: Case Studies in Forensic Anthropology (New

    Jersey: Prentice Hall, 2009), pp. 280-288.

  79. D. H. Ubelaker, D. W. Owsley, M. M. Houck, E. Craig, W. Grant, T. Woltanski, R. Fram, K.
  80. Sandness and N. Peerwani, ‘The Role of Forensic Anthropology in the Recovery and

    Analysis of Branch Davidian Compound Victims: Recovery Procedures and Characteristics of the Victims’, Journal of Forensic Sciences, 1995, 40, 3, 335-340.

  81. D. H. Ubelaker and K. M. Montaperto, ‘Recovery and Analysis of Human Remains from
  82. Aquatic Contexts’, in ‘Guidelines for Marine Forensic Investigations’, The Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Technical and Research Bulletin, 2012, 8, 1, 1-11.

  83. J. Hunter and M. Cox, ‘The Recovery of Forensic Evidence from Individual Graves: Case
  84. Studies 14-29’, in Forensic Archaeology: Advances in Theory and Practice (New York:

    Routledge, 2005), pp. 96-136.

  85. J. Hunter and M. Cox, ‘Search and Location: Case Studies 1-13’, in Forensic Archaeology:
  86. Advances in Theory and Practice (New York: Routledge, 2005), pp. 27-61.

    Part 8: Mass Fatalities and Human Rights Violations

  87. E. Stover, W. D. Haglund and M. Samuels, ‘Exhumation of Mass Graves in Iraq:
  88. Considerations for Forensic Investigations, Humanitarian Needs, and the Demands of Justice’, Journal of the American Medical Association, 2003, 290, 5, 663-666.

  89. R. Wright, ‘Uncovering Genocide. War Crimes: The Archaeological Evidence’, International Network on Holocaust and Genocide, 1996, 11, 3, pp. 8-11.
  90. S. Blau and M. F. Skinner, ‘The Use of Forensic Archaeology in the Investigation of Human Rights Abuse: Unearthing the Past in East Timor’, The International Journal of Human Rights, 2005, 9, 4, 449-463.
  91. C. Perera and C. Briggs, ‘Guidelines for the Effective Conduct of Mass Burials Following Mass Disasters: Post-Asian Tsunami Disaster Experience in Retrospect’, Forensic Science,
  92. Medicine, and Pathology, 2008, 4, 1, 1-8.

  93. C. A. Briggs and A. M. Buck, ‘The Role of the Anthropologist in Disaster Victim
  94. Identification: The Bali Incidents of 2002 and 2004’, in S. Blau and D. H. Ubelaker (eds),

    Handbook of Forensic Anthropology and Archaeology (California: Left Coast Press, 2009), pp. 407-415.

  95. J. Sterenberg, ‘Dealing with the Remains of Conflict: An International Response to Crimes Against Humanity, Forensic Recovery, Identification, and Repatriation in the Former Yugoslavia’, in S. Blau and D. H. Ubelaker (eds), Handbook of Forensic Anthropology and Archaeology (California: Left Coast Press, 2009), pp. 416-425.
  96. S. Schmitt, ‘Mass Graves and the Collection of Forensic Evidence: Genocide, War Crimes
  97. and Crimes against Humanity’, in W. D. Haglund and M. H. Sorg (eds), Advances in

    Forensic Taphonomy. Method, Theory, and Archaeological Perspectives (Florida: CRC

    Press, 2002), pp. 277-292.

  98. M. F. Skinner, H. P. York and M. A. Connor, ‘Postburial Disturbance of Graves in Bosnia-
  99. Herzegovina’, in W. D. Haglund and M. H. Sorg (eds), Advances in Forensic Taphonomy.

    Method, Theory, and Archaeological Perspectives (Florida: CRC Press, 2002), pp. 292-308.

  100. P. S. Sledzik and W. C. Rodriguez III, ‘Damnum Fatale: The Taphonomic Fate of Human
  101. Remains in Mass Disasters’, in W. D. Haglund and M. H. Sorg (eds), Advances in Forensic

    Taphonomy. Method, Theory, and Archaeological Perspectives (Florida: CRC Press, 2002), pp. 322-330.

  102. P. D. Emanovsky and W. R. Belcher, ‘The Many Hats of a Recovery Leader: Perspectives on Planning and Executing Worldwide Forensic Investigations and Recoveries at the JPAC Central Identification Laboratory’, in D. C. Dirkmaat (ed.), A Companion to Forensic
  103. Anthropology (London: Blackwell Publishing Ltd., 2012), pp. 567-592.

  104. P. S. Sledzik, ‘Forensic Anthropology in Mass Disasters’, in M. T. A. Tersigni-Tarrant and
  105. N. R. Shirley (eds), Forensic Anthropology: An Introduction (London and New York: CRC

    Press, 2013), pp. 439-450.

  106. P. S. Sledzik, D. C. Dirkmaat, R. W. Mann, T. D. Holland, A. Zelson Mundorff, B. J. Adams,
  107. C. M. Crowder and F. DePaolo, ‘Disaster Victim Recovery and Identification: Forensic

    Anthropology in the Aftermath of September 11’, in D. Wolfe Steadman (ed.), Hard

    Evidence: Case Studies in Forensic Anthropology (New Jersey: Prentice Hall, 2009), pp.

    289-302.

  108. M. Doretti and C. C. Snow, ‘Forensic Anthropology and Human Rights: The Argentine
  109. Experience’, in D. Wolfe Steadman (ed.), Hard Evidence: Case Studies in Forensic

    Anthropology (New Jersey: Prentice Hall, 2009), pp. 303-320.

  110. D. Olmo, A. Ginarte, C. Bisso, M. Salado Puerto and L. Fondebrider, ‘A Mass Grave in
  111. Argentina: The San Vicente Cemetery in Córdoba’, in D. Wolfe Steadman (ed.), Hard

    Evidence: Case Studies in Forensic Anthropology (New Jersey: Prentice Hall, 2009), pp.

    321-331.

  112. M. Tidball-Binz, ‘Global Forensic Science and the Search for the Dead and Missing from Armed Conflict: The Perspective of the International Committee of the Red Cross’, D. H.
  113. Ubelaker (ed.), Forensic Science: Current Issues, Future Directions (Oxford: WileyBlackwell, 2013), pp. 337-365.

  114. W. D. Haglund, M. Connor and D. D. Scott, ‘The Archaeology of Contemporary Mass Graves’, Historical Archaeology, 2001, 35, 1, 57-69.

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