Global Justice Activism and Policy Reform in Europe : Understanding When Change Happens book cover
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Global Justice Activism and Policy Reform in Europe
Understanding When Change Happens





ISBN 9781138920569
Published November 3, 2015 by Routledge
243 Pages 6 B/W Illustrations

 
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Book Description

Civil society activism around issues of global justice has proliferated in Europe during the past two decades. Has such contestation and advocacy made a difference? This book examines whether and how the organizations, networks and campaigns involved have attained their policy objectives in the areas of debt relief, international trade, international taxation and corporate accountability. The analysis also considers the relationship between national and transnational activism. By comparing variations in the "activism-policy nexus" in France, Italy and the United Kingdom, it seeks to understand how such interaction and policy outcomes vary in different institutional and political contexts.

Table of Contents

Introduction: Understanding the Activism-Policy Nexus  Anne Ellersiek, Mario Pianta and Peter Utting  Part I: Actors, Institutions and Networks  1. Elite Business Power and Activist Responses  Peter Utting  2. National Policy Regimes: Implications for the Activism-Policy Nexus  Daniela Barrier  3. The Potential and Practice of Civic Networks  Jem Bendell and Anne Ellersiek  4. Global Social Movement Networks and the Politics of Change  Raffaele Marchetti and Mario Pianta  Part II: The Activism-Policy Nexus in Practice  5. Global Networks on Trade Policy: The Case of the WTO Conference in Cancun  Federico Silva  6. Advocacy for Corporate Accountability and Trade Justice: The Role of ‘Noble Networks’ in the United Kingdom  Jem Bendell and Anne Ellersiek  7. Reforming Agricultural and Trade Policy in France: The Limits of Multi-Actor Coalitions  Benoit Daviron and Tancrède Voituriez  8. Debt Relief and Trade Justice in Italy  Paolo Gerbaudo and Mario Pianta  9. Dropping the Debt? British Anti-Debt Campaigns and International Development Policy  Clare Saunders and Tasos Papadimitriou  10. The Struggle for Third World Debt Relief in France  Rodrigo Conteras Osorio  11. Global Justice and/as Global Democracy: The UK Campaign for a Tobin Tax  James Brassett  12. Campaign or ‘Movement of Movements’? Attac France and the Currency Transaction Tax (CTT)  Edouard Morena  13. How Can Activism Make Change Happen?  Mario Pianta, Anne Ellersiek and Peter Utting

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Editor(s)

Biography

Peter Utting is Deputy Director of the United Nations Research Institute for Social Development (UNRISD).

Mario Pianta is Professor of Economic Policy at the University of Urbino. He has been Fernand Braudel Fellow at the European University Institute and visiting fellow at the London School of Economics and at the Université de Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne.

Anne Ellersiek is a visiting fellow at UNRISD. Anne obtained her Ph.D. from the Department of Organization Studies at Tilburg University, The Netherlands, and specializes in research on the design, management and governance of inter-organizational networks in international development and trans-national advocacy.

Featured Author Profiles

Author - Raffaele  Marchetti
Author

Raffaele Marchetti

Assistant Professor of International Relations, LUISS
Rome

Learn more about Raffaele Marchetti »

Reviews

"Research on the effects of social movements is still rare. This volume is a valuable exception presenting fresh ideas and data on the conditions under which social movement campaigns succeed or fail in changing national policies in Europe."

- Donatella della Porta, European University Institute, Fiesole

"Anyone interested in whether, when and how activists can bring about fairer global policies should read this book. It departs from the common practice of focusing on a few successful cases, and instead offers a systematic survey of a range of important policy areas in several wealthy democracies. The result is a more nuanced and realistic assessment of both the potential and the limits of civil society involvement in global public policy making."

- Mathias Koenig-Archibugi, London School of Economics and Political Science