1st Edition

Global Perspectives on Cultural Property Crime

    272 Pages 20 B/W Illustrations
    by Routledge

    This book provides transnational insight into cultural property crimes and the cutting-edge work tackling issues ranging from currency crimes to innovative research methods.

    The volume brings together authors from a number of fields to address contemporary issues and advances in the fight against cultural property crime. It combines the perspectives of law enforcement officials, researchers, journalists, lawyers, and scholars, with specialities in the disciplines of criminology, law, archaeology, museum studies, political science, and economics, from countries all around the globe. This allows for a more comprehensive examination of issues facing these professionals and highlights similarities between the challenges encountered in different disciplines as well as in diverse locations. It seeks to disseminate the most current work in this field from a broad array of viewpoints in order to further facilitate an exchange of ideas and lay the groundwork to inspire future collaborations. Most significantly, it provides more specific suggestions for moving forward that could help assist stakeholders to connect and work directly with each other, despite international borders and discipline-related boundaries.

    The book will be a valuable resource for researchers, practitioners, and policymakers working in the area of cultural property crime.

    Part 1: CHALLENGES OF OWNERSHIP: PAST AND PRESENT

    1. Introduction
    2. Michelle D. Fabiani

    3. Different strokes for different folks: A re-evaluation of the ontology of provenance research towards a more responsive research discipline
    4. Gareth Fletcher

    5. Whose Duty is it Anyway? On the Burden of Proof in Applying Due Diligence Standards When Dealing with Cultural Property
    6. Paul Fabel, Louisa Kimmig

    7. The Cycle of Good Faith: Evaluating the Status of Due Diligence in the Art Market
    8. Aubrey Catrone

    9. What Auction Catalogue Analysis Cannot Tell Us About the Market: Sotheby’s 2013 Sale of Pre-Columbian Objects from the Barbier-Mueller Collection
    10. Donna Yates

      Part 2: THE INTERSECTION OF ART, ANTIQUITIES, AND CURRENCY CRIMES

    11. Money Laundering and Art – Correlations of Crime Financing and Money Laundering Cost to Criminal Decision Making
    12. Katharina Stoll

    13. Protection of Cultural Objects Against Money Laundering: Contributions of Rational Choice Theory
    14. Diogo Machado, Leila Ollaik

    15. More than Antiquities Trafficking: The Issue is Antiquities Laundering
    16. Anna Mosna

      Part 3: INNOVATIVE RESEARCH & CHALLENGES IN THE FIELD

    17. Radiocarbon Dating Method and the Protection of Cultural Heritage
    18. Irka Hajdas

    19. The Space Between: Spatial Patterns of Archaeological Looting Attempts and Conflict in Lower Egypt
    20. Michelle D. Fabiani

    21. "Do you expect us to throw it all away?" - Thirty Years of Looted Iraqi Cuneiform Archives
    22. Luise Loges

    23. Challenges to Study: Difficulties Arising in Studying Fine Art Theft
    24. Kate Melody Burmon

      Part 4: POLICING AND POLICY

    25. Offences Relating to ‘Dealing’ in Cultural Property: The UK Approach
    26. Emily Gould

    27. Metal Detecting in England and Wales: A Transatlantic Problem
    28. Adam Daubney

    29. Countering Illicit Trafficking of Cultural Property in Ukraine
    30. Volodymyr Hulkevych

    31. Connecting the Dots: Models of Public-Private Cooperation in Cultural Property Crime Policing
    32. Richard van Herzeele

    33. ISIS, Blood Antiquities, and the International Fight against Terrorism Financing

    Costanza Musu

    Conclusion

    Kate Melody Burmon

    Biography

    Michelle D. Fabiani is an assistant professor of criminal justice in the Henry C. Lee College of Criminal Justice and Forensic Science at the University of New Haven, located in the United States.

    Kate Melody Burmon is a researcher scholar affiliated with the Ronan Institute, located in the United States.

    Saskia Hufnagel is a reader in criminal law and co-director of the Criminal Justice Centre (CJC) at Queen Mary University of London, located in the United Kingdom.