Handbook of Laser Technology and Applications : Laser Design and Laser Systems (Volume Two) book cover
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Handbook of Laser Technology and Applications
Laser Design and Laser Systems (Volume Two)




ISBN 9781138032620
Published June 24, 2021 by CRC Press
716 Pages

 
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Book Description

This comprehensive handbook gives a fully updated guide to lasers and laser systems, including the complete range of their technical applications. The first volume outlines the fundamental components of lasers, their properties and working principles. The second volume gives exhaustive coverage of all major categories of lasers, from solid-state and semiconductor diode to fiber, waveguide, gas, chemical, and dye lasers. The third volume covers modern applications in engineering and technology, including all new and updated case studies spanning telecommunications and data storage to medicine, optical measurement, defense and security, nanomaterials processing and characterization.

Table of Contents

Contents

Preface............................................................................................................................................................................................. ix

Editors.............................................................................................................................................................................................. xi

Contributors...................................................................................................................................................................................xiii

1. Solid-State Lasers: Section Introduction.............................................................................................................................. 1

R. C. Powell

2. Transition Metal Ion Lasers—Cr3+....................................................................................................................................... 3

Georges Boulon

3. Transition Metal Ion Lasers Other Than Cr3+................................................................................................................... 25

Stephen A. Payne

4. Rare-Earth Ion Lasers—Nd3+............................................................................................................................................. 35

A. I. Zagumennyi, V. A. Mikhailov, and I. A. Shcherbakov

5. Rare-Earth Ions—Miscellaneous: Ce3+, U3+, Divalent, etc............................................................................................... 55

Gregory J. Quarles

6. Ti:sapphire: Material, Lasers and Amplifiers................................................................................................................... 69

Peter F. Moulton, Alan R. Fry, and Peter Fendel

7. Lanthanide Series Lasers—Near-Infrared........................................................................................................................ 83

Norman P. Barnes

8. Lasers Based on Non-Linear Effects..................................................................................................................................101

Fabienne Pellé

9. Solid-State Raman Lasers.................................................................................................................................................. 127

T. T. Basiev and R. C. Powell

10. Colour Centre Lasers...........................................................................................................................................................151

T. T. Basiev, P. G. Zverev, and S. B. Mirov

11. Laser Diodes: Section Introduction....................................................................................................................................167

Ian White

12. Basic Principles of Laser Diodes........................................................................................................................................ 169

Niloy K. Dutta

13. Spectral Control in Laser Diodes...................................................................................................................................... 195

Markus-Christian Amann

14. High-Speed Laser Diodes....................................................................................................................................................211

Peter P. Vasil’ev

15. High-Power Laser Diodes and Laser Diode Arrays........................................................................................................ 225

Peter Unger

16. Visible Laser Diodes: Properties of III–V Red-Emitting Laser Diodes........................................................................ 235

Peter Blood

17. Visible Laser Diodes: Properties of Blue Laser Diodes................................................................................................... 251

Robert Martin

18. Long-Wavelength Laser Diodes......................................................................................................................................... 263

S. Anders, G. Strasser, and E. Gornik

19. Semiconductor Lasers and Optical Amplifiers for Switching and Signal Processing................................................. 273

Hitoshi Kawaguchi

20. Silicon-Based Lasers........................................................................................................................................................... 287

Qiang Li, Bei Shi, and Yu Han

21. Gas/Vapour Lasers: Section Introduction........................................................................................................................ 299

Julian Jones

22. Atomic Gas Lasers: Helium–Neon Lasers........................................................................................................................ 301

Alan D. White and Lisa Tsufura

23. Helium–Cadmium Laser.................................................................................................................................................... 309

William T. Silfvast

24. Copper and Gold Vapour Lasers........................................................................................................................................315

Colin Webb

25. Ion Lasers: Argon and Krypton Ion Lasers..................................................................................................................... 325

Malcolm H. Dunn and Tony Gutierrez

26. Carbon Dioxide Lasers....................................................................................................................................................... 337

Denis R. Hall

27. Excimer Lasers: F2, N2 and H2 Lasers.............................................................................................................................. 365

W. J. Witteman

28. High-Brightness Excimer Lasers and Extreme Conditions They Produce................................................................... 403

Sándor Szatmári

29. Optically Pumped Mid-IR Lasers: NH3, C2H2..................................................................................................................419

Mary S. Tobin

30. Far-IR Lasers: HCN, H2O.................................................................................................................................................. 433

Wilhelm Prettl

31. Diode-Pumped Alkali Lasers (DPALs)............................................................................................................................. 441

Boris Zhdanov and Randall Knize

32. Chemical Lasers:Section Introduction............................................................................................................................. 449

Julian Jones

33. Chemical Lasers: COIL......................................................................................................................................................451

B. D. Barmashenko and S. Rosenwaks

34. Chemical Lasers: HF/DF.................................................................................................................................................... 467

Lee H. Sentman

35. Fiber and Waveguide Lasers: Section Introduction........................................................................................................ 475

R. C. Powell

36. Fibre Lasers......................................................................................................................................................................... 477

Wei Shi, Shijie Fu, and Qiang Fang

37. High-Power Fibre Lasers.................................................................................................................................................... 489

Christophe A. Codemard and M. N. Zervas

38. Raman Fibre Lasers........................................................................................................................................................... 501

Igor Bufetov and Sergey Babin

39. Solitons and Dissipative Solitons for Ultrafast Lasers.....................................................................................................521

Ph Grelu

40. Bismuth-Doped Fibre Lasers and Optical Amplifiers..................................................................................................... 535

Evgeny Dianov

41. Erbium and Other Doped Fibre Amplifiers..................................................................................................................... 557

Kevin Cordina

42. High-Power Planar Waveguide Lasers............................................................................................................................. 571

J. I. Mackenzie and D. P. Shepherd

43. MEMS-Based Swept Laser Source................................................................................................................................... 585

John O. Gerguis, Yasser M. Sabry, Haitham Omran, and Diaa Khalil

44. Dye Lasers: Section Introduction...................................................................................................................................... 599

Colin Webb

45. Liquid Lasers....................................................................................................................................................................... 601

David H. Titterton

46. Solid-State Dye Lasers........................................................................................................................................................ 623

David H. Titterton

47. Other Lasers: Section Introduction.................................................................................................................................. 637

Colin Webb, Subhash C. Singh, and Chunlei Guo

48. Free-Electron Lasers and Synchrotron Light Sources................................................................................................... 639

P. G. O’Shea and J. B. Murphy

49. X-Ray Lasers........................................................................................................................................................................ 653

Jorge J. Rocca

50. Terahertz Lasers................................................................................................................................................................. 671

Taiichi Otsuji

Index............................................................................................................................................................................................. 685

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Editor(s)

Biography

Chunlei Guo is a Professor in The Institute of Optics and Physics at the University of Rochester. Before joining the Rochester faculty in 2001, he earned a PhD in Physics from the University of Connecticut and did his postdoctoral training at Los Alamos National Laboratory. His research is in studying femtosecond laser interactions with matter, spanning from atoms and molecules to solid materials. His research at University of Rochester has led to the discoveries of a range of highly functionalized materials through femtosecond laser processing, including the so-called black and colored metals and superhydrophillic and superhydrophobic surfaces. These innovations may find a broad range of applications, and have also been extensively featured by the media, including multiple New York Times articles. Lately, he devoted a significant amount of efforts to developing technologies for global sanitation by working with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Through this mission, he visited Africa multiple times to understand humanitarian issues. To further expand global collaboration under the Gates project, he helped establish an international laboratory at Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics, and Physics in China. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society, Optical Society of America, and International Academy of Photonics & Laser Engineering. He has authored about 300 referred journal articles.

Subhash C. Singh is a scientist at the Institute of Optics, University of Rochester and an Associate Professor at Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics, and Physics. Dr. Singh earned a Ph.D. in Physics from University of Allahabad, India in 2009. Prior to working with the Guo Lab, he was IRCSETEMPOWER Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Dublin City University, Ireland for 2 years and a DST-SERB Young Scientist at University of Allahabad for 3 years. He has more than 10 years of research experience in the fields of laser-matter interaction, plasma, nanomaterial processing, spectroscopy, energy applications, plasmonics, and photonics. He has published more than 100 research articles in reputable refereed journals and conference proceedings. His past editor experience includes serving as the main editor for Wiley-VCH book Nanomaterials; Processing and Characterization with Lasers and guest editor for special issues of a number of journals.