Historical Perspectives on Organized Crime and Terrorism (Hardback) book cover

Historical Perspectives on Organized Crime and Terrorism

Edited by James Windle, John F. Morrison, Aaron Winter, Andrew Silke

© 2018 – Routledge

248 pages | 2 B/W Illus.

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Hardback: 9781138652651
pub: 2018-03-13
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Description

In recent years, in the context of the War on Terror and globalisation, there has been an increased interest in terrorism and organised crime in academia, yet historical research into such phenomena is relatively scarce. This book resets the balance and emphasises the importance of historical research to understanding terrorism and organised crime.

This book explores historical accounts of organised crime and terrorism, drawing on research from around the world in such areas as the USA, UK, Ireland, France, Colombia, Somalia, Burma, Turkey and Trinidad and Tobago. Combining key case studies with fresh conceptualizations of organized crime and terrorism, this book reinvigorates scholarship by comparing and contrasting different historical accounts and considering their overlaps. Critical ‘lessons learned’ are drawn out from each chapter, providing valuable insights for current policy, practice and scholarship. This book is an indispensable guide for understanding the wider history of terrorism and organised crime. It maps key historical changes and trends in this area and underlines the vital importance of history in understanding critical contemporary issues.

Taking an interdisciplinary approach and written by leading criminologists, historians and political scientists, this book will be of particular interest to students of terrorism/counter-terrorism, organised crime, drug policy, criminology, security studies, politics, international relations, sociology and history.

Table of Contents

1. Introduction: Hawking the historical method in organised crime and terrorism studies (James Windle, John F. Morrison, Aaron Winter and Andrew Silke)

Organised Crime

2. ‘A citadel of crime’: Saint Paul, Minnesota, and the O’Connor System (James A. Densley)

3. The causes of traditional organized crime: Comparing Chicago and New York (Robert M Lombardo)

4. The French Connection: A brief critical history (Ryan Gingeras)

5. 'He just wasn’t the bloke I used to know': Social capital and the fragmentation of a British organised crime network (James Windle)

Terrorism

6. 1975: The truce that changed the Troubles (John F. Morrison)

7. The Klan is history: A historical perspective on the revival of the far-right in ‘post-racial’ America (Aaron Winter)

Terrorism and Organised Crime?

8. Somali maritime predation: Traditional piracy or a new form of terrorism? (Anamika Twyman-Ghoshal)

9. Narcoterrorism in Colombia (Francis Gaffney)

10. Empire, war, decolonisation and the birth of the illicit opium trade in Burma, 1800-1961 (John Collins)

11. Jamaat-al-Muslimeen: The blurred lines between organised crime and terrorism in Trinidad and Tobago (Andrew Silke)

Index

About the Editors

James Windle is Lecturer in Criminology at University College Cork, and Senior Lecturer in Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of East London.

John Morrison is Reader in Criminology and Criminal Justice and director of Terrorism and Extremism Research Centre (TERC) at the University of East London.

Aaron Winter is Senior Lecturer in Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of East London.

Andrew Silke is Professor and Director of Terrorism Studies at the University of East London.

About the Series

Routledge SOLON Explorations in Crime and Criminal Justice Histories

This series is a collaboration between Routledge and the SOLON consortium (promoting studies in law, crime and history), to present cutting edge interdisciplinary research in crime and criminal justice history, through monographs and thematic collected editions which reflect on key issues and dilemmas in criminology and socio-legal studies by locating them within a historical dimension. The series emphasizes inspiring historical and historiographical methodological approaches to contextualise and understand current priorities and problems and aims to highlight the best, most innovative interdisciplinary work from both new and established scholars in the field, through focusing on the enduring historical resonances to current core criminological and socio-legal issues.

Learn more…

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