Introducing Social Geographies  book cover
1st Edition

Introducing Social Geographies




ISBN 9780340720066
Published August 31, 2001 by Routledge
320 Pages

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Book Description

`Introducing Social Geographies' is a major new text offering a comprehensive and up-to-date introduction to this important area of human geography. It presents a broad overview of social geography, clearly outlining the key theoretical and political positions, and making extensive use of examples to show how these frameworks can be used to analyse real social issues.



The book is ideal for undergraduates first encountering social geography and includes topic overviews, summaries of key points, critiques, boxed case studies and suggestions for further reading.

Table of Contents

Introduction
Part A Society, material life and geography: Work, class and social life
The place of leisure
Communities. Part B: Power, identity and social geography: Race and ethnicity
Geographies of gender and sexuality
Age, generation and life course
Geographies of disability. Part C: Social Geography and social problems: Society, nature and landscape
Housing, space and society
Crime, space and inequality Geographies of poverty
Bibliography.

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Author(s)

Biography

Rachel Pain is a Lecturer in Cultural and Social Geography at the University of Durham. Her teaching and research interests include geographies of crime, fear of crime and community safety, health, gender, ageing, and qualitative methods.
Michael Barke is a Reader in Human Geography at the University of Northumbria. His teaching and research interests include the impact of housing policy change on local communities, the changing social geography of nineteenth- and twentieth-century Tyneside, and global change and development. His previous books include: Barke, M. and O’Hare, G. P. (1984) The Third World: Diversity, Change and Interdependence. Edinburgh: Oliver & Boyd (2nd edn, Oliver & Boyd/Longman, 1991). Barke, M. (1986) Transport and Trade. Edinburgh: Oliver & Boyd. Barke, M. (1991) Cast Studies of the Third World. Harlow: Oliver & Boyd/Longman. Barke, M. and Turnbull, G. (1992) Meadowell: The biography of an ‘Estate with Problems’. Aldershot: Avebury. Barke, M. and Buswell, R. J. (eds) (1992) Newcastle’s Changing Map. Newcastle upon Tyne: City Libraries and Arts. Barke, M. Towner, J. and Newton, M. T. (1996) Tourism in Spain: Critical Issues. Wallingford: CAB International.
Duncan Fuller is a Lecturer in Social and Economic Geography at the University of Northumbria. His teaching and research interests include geographies of inclusion and exclusion, money, credit union development, poverty, disability, anthropological and psychoanalytical theories, and qualitative methods and academic activism.
Jamie Gough is a Senior Lecturer in Human Geography at the University of Northumbria. His teaching and research interests include industrial, economic and urban geography, particularly labour processes and their geography, urban and regional economies, flows of value within cities, and relationships between economic governance at different spatial scales. His previous books include: Gough, J. and MacNair, M. (1985) Gay Liberation in the Eighties. Pluto: London. Eisenschitz, A. and Gough, J. (1993) The Politics of Local Economic Policy. Basingstoke: Macmillan. Gough, J. (2001) Work, Locality and the Rhythms of Capital. London: Continuum.
Robert MacFarlane is a Senior Lecturer in Geography and Environmental Management at the University of Northumbria. His teaching and research interests include the meaning and management of landscapes, urban nature conservation initiatives, landscape ecology and Geographical Information System applications in the developed and developing worlds.
Graham Mowl is a Senior Lecturer in Human Geography at the University of Northumbria. His teaching and research interests include geography of leisure, impacts of tourism development, disability, gender relations and ageing.

Reviews

Good value for money; it is highly recommended as essential reading for students engaging with the central concerns of a modern social geography.
Submitted to Geography, April 2002

An ideal book for students first encountering social geography and a must for social geography courses.
Educational Book Review