Introduction to Byzantium, 602–1453: 1st Edition (Paperback) book cover

Introduction to Byzantium, 602–1453

1st Edition

By Jonathan Harris

Routledge

312 pages

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Description

Introduction to Byzantium, 602-1453 provides students with an accessible guide to medieval Byzantium.

Beginning with the near collapse of Byzantium in the seventh century, the book traces its survival and development through to its absorption by the Ottoman Empire. As well having an overall political narrative, the chapters cover a wide range of topics including society and economy, art and architecture, literature and education, military tactics and diplomacy, gender and education. They also explore themes that remain prominent and highly debated today, including relations between Islam and the West, the impact of the Crusades, the development of Russia, and the emergence of Orthodox Christianity. Comprehensively written, each chapter provides an overview of the particular period or topic, a summary of the ongoing historiographical debates, primary source material textboxes, further reading recommendations and a ‘points to remember’ section.

Introduction to Byzantium, 602-1453 provide students with a thorough introduction to the history of Byzantium and equips them with the tools to write successful analytical essays. It is essential reading for any student of the history of the Byzantium Empire.

Reviews

'This book provides a fresh and up-to-date treatment of the Byzantine empire from 602 to 1453. It will be particularly useful for undergraduates encountering the Byzantine empire for the first time. Despite its broad coverage it conveys key debates and differences of interpretation. It is particularly distinguished by its use of boxes, which allows for deeper engagement with sources and also reflection on the development of the field of Byzantine Studies itself.'

Shaun Tougher, Cardiff University, UK

Table of Contents

Introduction

i. What’s in a Name?

ii. The Study of Byzantium

iii. Byzantium in 602 CE

iv. The Tragic End of Emperor Maurice

Points to Remember

Suggestions for Further Reading

Part I: Crisis and Survival 602-820

  1. Major Literary Sources for the Period 602-820
  2. i. Byzantine Literature and Education

    ii. Patriarch Nikephoros

    iii. Theophanes Confessor

    iv. Other types of Source: Hagiography and Military Manuals

    v. Sources from Outside Byzantium

    Points to Remember

    Primary Sources in English Translation

    Suggestions for Further Reading

  3. Herakleios and the Wars of Survival (602-642)
  4. i. The Spiralling Crisis (602-622)

    ii. Defeat into Victory (622-629)

    iii. Why the War was Won

    iv. Victory into Defeat (629-642)

    v. What Went Wrong?

    vi. The Balkans and the Western Provinces

    Points to Remember

    Suggestions for Further Reading

  5. The Dark Age (642-718)
  6. i. The New Enemy: The Umayyad Caliphate

    ii. Constantinople under Siege

    iii. The Battle for Asia Minor

    iv. The Reorganisation of Asia Minor

    v. The Balkans and the Western Provinces

    Points to Remember

    Suggestions for Further Reading

  7. The Beginnings of the Revival (718-820)
  8. i. The North Syrian Dynasty

    ii. Iconoclasm

    iii. The Reign of Irene (780-802)

    iv. The Limits of Revival: Bulgaria

    v. The Limits of Revival: Italy

    Points to Remember

    Suggestions for Further Reading

    Part II: Reconquest and Hegemony 820-1045

  9. Major Literary Sources for the Period 820-1045
  10. i. The ‘Macedonian Renaissance’

    ii. Historians at the Court of Constantine VII (945-959)

    iii. Leo the Deacon

    iv. Michael Psellos

    v. Another Kind of Source: Letters

    Points to Remember

    Primary Sources in English Translation

    Suggestions for Further Reading

  11. Amorians, Macedonians and Lekapenids (820-959)
  12. i. The Amorian Dynasty (820-867)

    ii. Basil I and the Macedonian Dynasty (867-912)

    iii. Church and State under the Amorians and Early Macedonians

    iv. Romanos I and the Lekapenid Interlude (912-945)

    v. The Macedonians Restored (945-959)

    Points to Remember

    Suggestions for Further Reading

  13. Economy and Culture
  14. i. Economic Revival

    ii. Art and Architecture

    iii. Monasteries

    iv. Cultural Influence

    v. Urban Life

    vi. Rural Life

    Points to Remember

    Suggestions for Further Reading

  15. Expansion and Social Change (959-1045)
  16. i. The Rise of a Landed, Military Aristocracy?

    ii. The Soldier Emperors (963-976)

    iii. Basil II (976-1025)

    iv. After Basil (1025-1045)

    Points to Remember

    Suggestions for Further Reading

    Part III: Contraction, Recovery and Calamity 1045-1204.

  17. Major Literary Sources for the Period 1045-1204
  18. i. Historians at the Komnenian court

    ii. Anna Komnene and the Alexiad

    iii. Niketas Choniates

    iv. Other sources: Political Speeches and Views from the West

    Points to Remember

    Primary Sources in English Translation

    Suggestions for Further Reading

  19. The Eleventh-Century Crisis (1045-1091)
  20. i. The Watershed Moment? The Reign of Constantine IX (1042-1055)

    ii. The End of the Macedonian Dynasty (1055-1067)

    iii. Romanos IV and the Battle of Manzikert (1067-1071)

    iv. The Fall of Asia Minor (1071-1081)

    v. The Struggle for the Balkans (1081-1091)

    Points to Remember

    Suggestions for Further Reading

  21. Stability under the Komnenos Dynasty (1091-1180)
  22. i. A New Style of Government under Alexios I

    ii. Alexios I and the First Crusade (1091-1118)

    iii. After Alexios: John II (1118-1143)

    iv. ‘Most happy emperor of illustrious memory’: Manuel I (1143-1180)

    v. Art and Architecture under the Komnenos Dynasty

    Points to Remember

    Suggestions for Further Reading

  23. The Road to Catastrophe (1180-1204)
  24. i. Instability Returns (1180-1185)

    ii. Alienation in the Provinces

    iii. From Alienation to Separation: Isaac II Angelos (1185-1195)

    iv. The Threat from the West: Alexios III Angelos (1195-1203)

    v. The Fourth Crusade (1203-4)

    Points to Remember

    Suggestions for Further Reading

    Part IV: Decline and Disappearance 1204-1453

  25. Major Literary Sources for the Period 1204-1453
  26. i. George Akropolites

    ii. The Last Attic Historians

    iii Historians writing after 1453

    iv. Other Sources: Western and Archival

    Points to Remember

    Primary Sources in English Translation

    Suggestions for Further Reading

  27. Exile and Restoration (1204-1282)
  28. i. The Aftermath of the Fourth Crusade (1204-1221)

    ii. John III and the Expansion of Nicaea (1221-1259)

    iii. Michael VIII and the Recovery of Constantinople (1259-1267)

    iv. The Challenge of Charles of Anjou (1267-1282)

    v. The Palaiologan Renaissance in Art and Education

    Points to Remember

    Suggestions for Further Reading

  29. Decline and Downfall (1282-1453)

i. The Calamitous Reign of Andronikos II (1282-1328)

ii. Civil War and Controversy (1328-1354)

iii. Urban and Rural Economy and Society

iv. The Descent into Vassaldom (1354-1394)

v. The Last Phase (1394-1453)

Points to Remember

Suggestions for Further Reading

16. Conclusion: Byzantium’s Legacy

Glossary

List of Emperors

Timeline

Web links

Bibliography of Secondary Literature

Index

 

About the Author

Jonathan Harris is Professor of the History of Byzantium at Royal Holloway, University of London, UK. His recent publications include: Byzantium and the Crusades (2nd ed, 2014); The Lost World of Byzantium (2015) and Constantinople: Capital of Byzantium (2nd ed., 2017).

Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
HIS000000
HISTORY / General
HIS002010
HISTORY / Ancient / Greece
HIS002020
HISTORY / Ancient / Rome
HIS003000
HISTORY / Asia / General
HIS010010
HISTORY / Europe / Eastern
HIS020000
HISTORY / Europe / Italy
HIS026000
HISTORY / Middle East / General
HIS026010
HISTORY / Middle East / Arabian Peninsula
HIS037010
HISTORY / Medieval
HIS039000
HISTORY / Civilization
HIS042000
HISTORY / Europe / Greece (see also Ancient / Greece)