Jazz and Totalitarianism: 1st Edition (Paperback) book cover

Jazz and Totalitarianism

1st Edition

Edited by Bruce Johnson

Routledge

364 pages

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Description

Jazz and Totalitarianism examines jazz in a range of regimes that in significant ways may be described as totalitarian, historically covering the period from the Franco regime in Spain beginning in the 1930s to present day Iran and China. The book presents an overview of the two central terms and their development since their contemporaneous appearance in cultural and historiographical discourses in the early twentieth century, comprising fifteen essays written by specialists on particular regimes situated in a wide variety of time periods and places. Interdisciplinary in nature, this compelling work will appeal to students from Music and Jazz Studies to Political Science, Sociology, and Cultural Theory.

Table of Contents

Introduction (Bruce Johnson)

Part I: Totalitarian Templates

1. Jazz and Fascism: Contradictions and Ambivalences in the Diffusion of Jazz Music under the Italian Fascist Dictatorship (1925-1935) (Marilisa Merolla)

2. Jazz in Moscow after Stalinism (Rüdiger Ritter)

Part II: In the Soviet Shadow

3. Four Spaces, Four Neanings: Narrating Jazz in Late Stalinist Estonia (Heli Reimann)

4. Jazz in Poland: Totalitarianism, Stalinism, Socialist Realism (Igor Pietraszewski)

5. Jazz in Czechoslovakia during the 1950s and 1960s (Wolf-Georg Zaddach)

6. Trouble with the Neighbours: Jazz, Geopolitics, and Finland’s Totalitarian Shadow (Marcus O'Dair)

Part III: Iberia - Spain

7. Performing the ‘Anti-Spanish’ Body: Jazz and Biopolitics in the Early Franco Regime (1939-1957) (Iván Iglesias)

8. ‘The Purest Essence of Jazz’: The Appropriation of Blues in Spain during Franco’s Dictatorship (Josep Pedro)

Part IV: Iberia - Portugal

9. Jazz and the Portuguese Dictatorship before and after the Second World War: From Moral Panic to Suspicious Acceptance (Pedro Roxo)

10. A Kind of 'in-between': Jazz and Politics in Portugal (1958-1974) (Pedro Cravinho)

Part V: Apartheid South Africa

11. A Climbing Vine through Concrete: Jazz in 1960s Apartheid South Africa (Jonathan Eato)

12. 'Fanfare for the warriors': Jazz, Education, and State Control in 1980s South Africa and After (Mark Duby)

Part VI: To the East

13. From the 'Sultan' to the Persian Side: Jazz in Iran and Iranian Jazz since the 1920s (G. J. Breyley)

14. On the Marginality of Contemporary Jazz in China: The Case of Beijing (Adiel Portugali)

15. Afterword: Conclusions (Bruce Johnson)

About the Editor

Bruce Johnson formerly a professor in English, is now Adjunct Professor, Communications, University of Technology Sydney, Visiting Professor, Music, University of Glasgow, and Docent and Visiting Professor, Cultural History, University of Turku.

About the Series

Transnational Studies in Jazz

The field of New Jazz Studies has emerged out of traditional modes of musicological inquiry, with an increasing number of scholars examining jazz as a discursive cultural practice. Drawing on a range of disciplinary perspectives, New Jazz Studies has begun to promote a multiplicity of canons, exploring the overlapping and exchanges between different countries and cultural groups and challenging existing modes of understanding. Transnational Studies in Jazz presents cross-disciplinary and international perspectives on the relationship between jazz and its social, political, and cultural contexts.

While supporting ongoing research on American themes, artists and scenes, Transnational Studies in Jazz also seeks to develop understandings of jazz in different contexts, approaching the American influence - as well as the rejection of America - through analysis of international discourses and local scenes. Through US, UK and international contributors, jazz would be understood not only as a sonic form or subject of artistic expression and analysis but also as a key social and political agent in the development and exchange of culture.

Learn more…

Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
MUS000000
MUSIC / General
MUS025000
MUSIC / Genres & Styles / Jazz