Knowledge Building in Early Modern English Music: 1st Edition (Hardback) book cover

Knowledge Building in Early Modern English Music

1st Edition

By Katie Bank

Routledge

296 pages | 17 B/W Illus.

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Hardback: 9780367519704
pub: 2020-08-17
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Description

Knowledge Building in Early Modern English Music is a rich, interdisciplinary investigation into the role of music and musical culture in the development of metaphysical thought in late sixteenth, early seventeenth-century England. The book considers how music presented questions about the relationships between the mind, body, passions, and the soul, drawing out examples of domestic music that explicitly address topics of human consciousness, such as dreams, love, and sensing. Early seventeenth century metaphysical thought is said to pave the way for the Enlightenment Self. Yet studies of the music’s role in natural philosophy has been primarily limited to symbolic functions in philosophical treatises, virtually ignoring music making’s substantial contribution to this watershed period. Contrary to prevailing narratives, the author shows why music making did not only reflect impending change in philosophical thought but contributed to its formation. It demonstrates how song confronted assumptions about reality and representation and the role of dialogue in cultural production, and other ideas linked to changes in how knowledge was built. Focusing on music by John Dowland, Martin Peerson, Thomas Weelkes, and William Byrd, this study revises historiography by reflecting on the experience of music and how music contributed to the way early modern awareness was shaped.

Table of Contents

1. Historiography of the English ‘Madrigal’ 2. The Music of Sense Perception 3. Music and Myth: Confronting Representations and Realities 4. Dialogues of Knowledge 5. Conclusion

About the Author

Katie Bank is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Sheffield and recent long-term National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow at the Newberry Library. She publishes on early modern English recreational song, musical intellectual history, and musical-visual culture.

About the Series

Routledge Studies in Renaissance and Early Modern Worlds of Knowledge

This series explores Renaissance and Early Modern Worlds of Knowledge (c.1400-c.1700) in Europe, the Americas, Asia and Africa. The volumes published in this series study the individuals, communities and networks involved in making and communicating knowledge during the first age of globalization. Authors investigate the perceptions, practices and modes of behaviour which shaped Renaissance and Early Modern intellectual endeavour and examine the ways in which they reverberated in the political, cultural, social and economic sphere.

The series is interdisciplinary, comparative and global in its outlook. We welcome submissions from new as well as existing fields of Renaissance Studies, including the history of literature (including neo-Latin, European and non-European languages), science and medicine, religion, architecture, environmental and economic history, the history of the book, art history, intellectual history and the history of music. We are particularly interested in proposals that straddle disciplines and are innovative in terms of approach and methodology.

The series includes monographs, shorter works and edited collections of essays. The Society for Renaissance Studies (http://www.rensoc.org.uk) provides an expert editorial board, mentoring, extensive editing and support for contributors to the series, ensuring high standards of peer-reviewed scholarship. We welcome proposals from early career researchers as well as more established colleagues.

SRS Board Members: Erik DeBom (KU Leuven, Belgium), Mordechai Feingold (California Institute of Technology, USA), Andrew Hadfield (Sussex), Peter Mack (University of Warwick, UK), Jennifer Richards (University of Newcastle, UK), Stefania Tutino (UCLA, USA), Richard Wistreich (Royal College of Music, UK)

If you are interested in submitting a proposal, please contact the series Editors, Harald Braun ([email protected]) and Emily Michelson ([email protected]), or Michael Greenwood at Routledge ([email protected])

 

Learn more…

Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
HIS000000
HISTORY / General