1st Edition

Knowledge Organizations
What Every Manager Should Know




ISBN 9781574441963
Published April 23, 1998 by CRC Press
208 Pages

USD $125.00

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Book Description

For knowledge management to be successful, the corporate culture needs to be adapted to encourage the creation, sharing, and distribution of knowledge within the organization. Knowledge Organizations: What Every Manager Should Know provides insight into how organizations can best accomplish this goal. Liebowitz and Beckman provide the information companies need for evaluating and planning the steps and processes that will transform their existing organization infrastructure into a "knowledge-based" organization. This easy-to-read guide includes many vignettes, examples, and short cases of organizations involved in knowledge management.

Table of Contents

The Knowledge Industry
Knowledge Organizations
Intellectual Capital and Knowledge Assets
Knowledge as a Commodity
Knowledge Management
Collecting and Selecting Knowledge
Organizing and Storing Knowledge
Creating Knowledge: Learning, Experimentation, Discovery, and Innovation.
Applying Innovative Information Technology
Implementing the Knowledge Organization
Future Knowledge Organizations
Index.

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Reviews

"Success in the marketplace is increasingly linked to an organization's ability to manage and leverage its intellectual capital -- the intangible and often invisible assets such as knowledge and competence of people, intellectual property, and information systems that don't show up directly on the bottom line but are at least as valuable as financial assets. Successful companies of the 21st century will be those who do the best jobs of capturing, storing, and leveraging what their employees know."
Lewis Platt, CEO, Hewlett Packard
"Success in the marketplace is increasingly linked to an organization's ability to manage and leverage its intellectual capital -- the intangible and often invisible assets such as knowledge and competence of people, intellectual property, and information systems that don't show up directly on the bottom line but are at least as valuable as financial assets. Successful companies of the 21st century will be those who do the best jobs of capturing, storing, and leveraging what their employees know."
Lewis Platt, CEO, Hewlett Packard