Logics of Legitimacy : Three Traditions of Public Administration Praxis book cover
SAVE
$19.99
1st Edition

Logics of Legitimacy
Three Traditions of Public Administration Praxis




ISBN 9781466511613
Published July 26, 2012 by Routledge
325 Pages 19 B/W Illustrations

 
SAVE ~ $19.99
was $99.95
USD $79.96

Prices & shipping based on shipping country


Preview

Book Description

The discipline of public administration draws predominantly from political and organizational theory, but also from other social and behavioral sciences, philosophy, and even theology. This diversity results in conflicting prescriptions for the "proper" administrative role. So, how are those new to public administration to know which ideas are "legitimate"?

Rather than accepting conventional arguments for administrative legitimacy through delegated constitutional authority or expertise, Logics of Legitimacy: Three Traditions of Public Administration Praxis does not assume that any one approach to professionalism is accepted by all scholars, practitioners, citizens, or elected representatives. Instead, it offers a framework for public administration theory and practice that fully includes the citizen as a political actor alongside elected representatives and administrators. This framework:

  • Considers both direct and representative forms of democracy
  • Examines concepts from both political and organizational theory, addressing many of the key questions in public administration
  • Examines past and present approaches to administration
  • Presents a conceptual lens for understanding public administration theory and explaining different administrative roles and practices

The framework for public administration theory and practice is presented in three traditions of main prescriptions for practice: Constitutional (the bureaucrat), Discretionary (the entrepreneur), and Collaborative (the steward). This book is appropriate for use in graduate-level courses that explore the philosophical, historical, and intellectual foundations of public administration. Upon qualified course adoption, instructors will gain access to a course outline and corresponding lecture slides.

Table of Contents

WHY AND HOW THE TRADITIONS FRAMEWORK WAS CREATED

The Legitimacy Question

Why Worry about Role Conceptualization? Professional Socialization in Public Administration
IntroductionThe Importance of Role Conceptualization in Public Administration
What Is Role Conceptualization?
How Role Conception Is Formed
     Step 1: Practitioner Acts as Role Taker
     Step 2: Role Performance Is Performed and Assessed
     Step 3: Experience Impacts Role Conception and Conceptualization
     Step 4: Pedagogy Transmits Role Conceptualizations

Using Theoretical Frameworks as Interpretive Lenses
Introduction
Developing and Assessing Theoretical Frameworks
     Significant Focus
     Organizing Capacity
     Coherency
Frameworks in Public Administration
     Dwight Waldo
     David Rosenbloom
     Richard Stillman
     Orion White
     David Farmer
     Jan Kooiman
     Historical Eras and Schools of Thought
          The Founding Era
          An Orthodoxy Emerges
          The Refounding Era
          The Reinventing Era
          The Transformational Era
Summing Up
Tradition as a Framework Metaphor

How the Traditions Framework Was Created
Introduction
Employing the Ideal-Type Method
     Identify a Social Phenomenon of Interest
     Choose a Culturally Significant Frame of Reference
     Identify Essential Generic Elements
     Interpret Genetic Meanings
     Construct the Ideal-Types

THE TRADITIONS FRAMEWORK

The Generic Elements of Each Tradition
Introduction
Political Ontology
Political Authority and Scope of Action
Criterion of Proper Behavior
Administrative Decision-Making
Rationality
Associated Organizing Style
Assumed Governance Context
Implications for Role Conceptualization
Pulling the Type Together

The Constitutional Tradition—Bureaucratic Accountability to the Constitutional Order
Portrait of a Bureaucrat
Introduction
Political Ontology
Political Authority and Scope of Action
Criterion of Proper Behavior
     Accountability through Neutral Competence
     Accountability through Agency Conservation
     Administrative Decision-Making Rationality
     Organizing Style
     Assumed Governance Context
     Implications for Role Conceptualization
     Tradition Summary

The Discretionary Tradition—Entrepreneurial Responsibility for Desirable Outcomes
Portraits of Entrepreneurs
Introduction
Political Ontology
Political Authority and Scope of Action
Criterion of Proper Behavior
     Responsibility for Instrumental Outcomes
     Responsibility for Social Outcomes
     Summary
Administrative Decision-Making Rationality
Organizing Style
Assumed Governance Context
Implications for Role Conceptualization
Tradition Summary

The Collaborative Tradition—Stewardship Responsiveness to the Citizenry
Portrait of a Steward
Introduction
Political Ontology
Political Authority and Scope of Action
Criterion of Proper Behavior
"Administrative" Decision-Making Rationality
Organizing Style
Assumed Governance Context
Implications for Role Conceptualization
Tradition Summary

CRITIQUE AND ANALYSIS

Mutual Critiques among Traditions
Introduction
How the Traditions Fail to Achieve Their Own Logics
     Elected Officials Fail to Represent or Control
     Administrators Fail to Follow Orders or Rules
     Discretion Fails to Produce the Public Good
     Collaboration Fails to Produce the Public Good
How the Traditions Fail According to Other Logics
     Democracy Is Inefficient and Ineffective
     Administrative Discretion Is Undemocratic
     Representation Is Problematic
     Government Has Been Captured by Market Interests or Self-Interest
     Collaboration Is Unconstitutional
     Collaboration Fails to Achieve the Public Interest (Because It Is Only Partial)
Summing Up

Integrations, Conciliations, and Dialectical Syntheses
Introduction
Key Integrations or Conciliations of Traditions
     Integrationist Approaches
     Conciliatory Approaches
     Summation
Dialectical Relationship Within and Among Traditions
     Dialectic Within Traditions
     Dialectic Among Traditions

Assessing Contextual Fit of the Traditions—A Mental Experiment
Introduction
The Emerging Contemporary Governance Context
Critical Discussion
     Structural Fit
     Normative Fit
Barriers to (R)Evolution
How Do We Get There?
Summation

References

Appendix: Foundations Course Outline
Section 1: Introduction to the Course and Its Purpose in the MPA Program
Section 2: The Landscape of Public Administration Theory
Section 3: The Historical Roots of Public Administration
Section 4: Competing Logics of Legitimacy in Public Administration
Section 5: Putting Theory into Practice: Blended Logics and Individual Preferences

Index

...
View More

Author(s)

Biography

Margaret Stout is an assistant professor of public administration at West Virginia University. Her research explores the role of public and nonprofit practitioners in achieving democratic social and economic justice with specific interests in administrative theory, public service leadership and ethics, and sustainable community development. She has a particularly strong interest in the ontological underpinnings of these issues. Her published work can be found in Administration & Society, Public Administration Review, Administrative Theory & Praxis, International Journal of Organization Theory and Behavior, Journal of Public Affairs Education, Public Administration and Management, Contemporary Justice Review, Encyclopedia of Public Administration and Public Policy, Second Edition, and PA Times. She serves on the board of the Public Administration Theory Network and is active in the American Society for Public Administration, serving as chair of the Section on Public Administration Education and on the board of the Section on Democracy and Social Justice. She also serves on the editorial board of Administrative Theory & Praxis and provides peer review for a host of other academic journals.

Dr. Stout’s first career was in human resource development, with a focus on work/life balance programming. Leading directly from related experiences in statewide and regional community and economic development initiatives, her second career was in community and youth development, serving as a community organizer, project manager, executive director, and organizational consultant to a host of nonprofit and government agencies in Arizona. She enjoys bringing these varied practitioner experiences into her current career as a professor.