Modest_Witness@Second_Millennium. FemaleMan_Meets_OncoMouse: Feminism and Technoscience, 2nd Edition (Paperback) book cover

Modest_Witness@Second_Millennium. FemaleMan_Meets_OncoMouse

Feminism and Technoscience, 2nd Edition

By Donna J. Haraway, Thyrza Goodeve

Routledge

374 pages

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pub: 2018-07-02
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Description

One of the founders of the posthumanities, Donna J. Haraway is professor in the History of Consciousness program at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Author of many books and widely read essays, including the now-classic essay "The Cyborg Manifesto," she received the J.D. Bernal Prize in 2000, a lifetime achievement award from the Society for Social Studies in Science.

Thyrza Nicholas Goodeve is a professor of Art History at the School of Visual Arts.

Reviews

"If Modest_Witness was a revelation twenty years ago when it was first published, it is essential reading now. We need this book to understand all that has become even more urgent, even more confounding and even more important. It is also a book that reveals how essential is the feminist engagement with science, one that encompasses questions of race and the history of colonialism for scholarship that remains ground-breaking and path-making." -Inderpal Grewal, Yale University

"Brava all over again! A true classic---requisite for beginners, deeply provocative at third reading. Leading with humor and politics, Haraway marks a transformation of our planet and sustains her project of revisioning its futures. A brilliant new introduction situates Modest_Witness and clarifies Haraway’s incisive and sorely needed conceptual universe." -Adele E. Clarke, University of California, San Francisco, USA

"From one of our most visionary contemporary thinkers, here is your guide to the New World Order of Technoscience. In this timely re-issue of Haraway’s intensely interesting, incisive, and inspiring exploration of what happens to life and living when technology becomes the beating heart of science, we learn how to ask the urgent questions. As genes and chips implode modernity’s defining distinctions—between nature and culture, science and society, technology and politics—what will guide and ground our ability to collectively think and live together? When a rodent can be both intellectual property and a model for breast cancer, who lives and dies and how, and what kin shall we keep? Who is the ‘we’—the collective—that will live these lives, and die these deaths? Haraway’s is a plea for a less-literal minded and more imaginative understanding of what is at stake in these powerful world making practices of modern biology. The task is critical. In a time when the bits and bytes of our bodies—our blood, tissue and DNA—are the site of massive worldly transformations, Haraway powerfully argues for the urgency of a civic biology, a biology which capacitates us to ask the formative questions."--Jenny Reardon, University of California, Santa Cruz, USA

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

Nothing Comes Without Its World: Donna J. Haraway in conversation with Thryza Nicols Goodeve

Part One

Syntactics: The Grammar of Feminism and Technoscience

Part Two

Semantics: Modest_Witness@Second_Millenium.FemaleMan_Meets_OncoMouse™

1 Modest_Witness@Second_Millenium

2 FemaleMan_Meets_OncoMouse™

Mice into Wormholes: A Technoscience Fugue in Two Parts

3 A Family Reunion

Part Three

Pragmatics: Technoscience in Hypertext

4 Gene: Maps and Portraits of Life Itself

5 Fetus: The Virtual Speculum in the New World Order

6 Race: Universal Donors in a Vampire Culture

7 Facts, Witnesses, and Consequences

Study Guide

Notes

References

Index

About the Authors

One of the founders of the posthumanities, Donna J. Haraway is professor in the History of Consciousness program at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Author of many books and widely read essays, including the now-classic essay "The Cyborg Manifesto," she received the J.D. Bernal Prize in 2000, a lifetime achievement award from the Society for Social Studies in Science.

Thyrza Nicholas Goodeve is a professor of Art History at the School of Visual Arts.

Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
ART023000
ART / Popular Culture
SOC010000
SOCIAL SCIENCE / Feminism & Feminist Theory
SOC052000
SOCIAL SCIENCE / Media Studies