More Philosophy for Teens : Examining Reality and Knowledge (Grades 7-12) book cover
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More Philosophy for Teens
Examining Reality and Knowledge (Grades 7-12)



ISBN 9781593632922
Published October 1, 2007 by Routledge
200 Pages

 
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Book Description

Is knowledge the greatest virtue? What is it like to be somebody else? What if tomorrow never comes? Is the world around us real? Your students will be asking these challenging questions and more after reading and completing the activities in More Philosophy for Teens. A companion to the best-selling Philosophy for Teens, this volume tackles the topics of reality and knowledge in a teenager-friendly format.

The authors examine some of life's toughest questions, including identity, God, the universe, freedom, and the meaning of life. Both sides of the debates are covered on every issue, with information from some of the world's most noted philosophers included in a conversational style that teenagers will love.

Grades 7-12

Table of Contents

Teacher’s Guide Introduction Part 1: The Self Chapter 1: Who Am I? Chapter 2: Am I the Same Person I Used to Be? Chapter 3: Am I Free? Chapter 4: How Should I Live? Part 2: Knowledge Chapter 5: Is Knowledge the Greatest Virtue? Chapter 6: Can Computers Think? Chapter 7: What Is It Like to Be Somebody Else? Chapter 8: What if Tomorrow Never Comes? Part 3: The Universe Chapter 9: Is the World Around Us Real? Chapter 10: Does the Universe Have a Beginning? Chapter 11: Is the Universe Finite or Infinite in Size? Chapter 12: What Is the Difference Between Genuine Science and Pseudoscience? Part 4: God Chapter 13: Is the Natural World an Accident? Chapter 14: Is It Reasonable to Believe? Chapter 15: What Is the Meaning of Life? Appendix A: Dialogue Worksheet Appendix B: Logic Skills Appendix C: Answer Key Glossary About the Authors Common Core State Standards Alignment

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Author(s)

Biography

For the past several years, Paul Thomson, Ph.D., has taught philosophy to high school students through the Carroll-Cleveland Philosophers' Program, which won the 2006 American Philosophical Association Award for Excellence and Innovation in Philosophy Programs. He currently serves as associate professor of philosophy at John Carroll University in Cleveland, OH.

For the past several years, Sharon M. Kaye, Ph.D., has taught philosophy to high school students through the Carroll-Cleveland Philosophers' Program, which won the 2006 American Philosophical Association Award for Excellence and Innovation in Philosophy Programs. She currently serves as professor of philosophy at John Carroll University in Cleveland, OH.