Multiculturalism in Practice : Irish, Jewish, Italian and Pakistani Migration to Scotland book cover
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Multiculturalism in Practice
Irish, Jewish, Italian and Pakistani Migration to Scotland




ISBN 9781138737839
Published October 27, 2017 by Routledge
270 Pages

 
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Book Description

This title was first published in 2000. Patterns of racism and disadvantage vary throughout Britain, yet most British research continues to focus on data from England and Wales. This Scottish study allows distinctions to emerge which contribute to our understanding of the complex processes of discrimination and integration. Looking first at the history of Irish, Jewish and Italian migration to Scotland, attention is then focused on the Pakistani population. Whilst acknowledging the persistence of racism, the author uses original quantitative and qualitative data to examine the ways in which immigrants and their descendants assert their priorities. The book questions whether focusing on minority ethnic groups as victims of racism is the most effective strategy in undermining exclusionary practices.

Table of Contents

Contents: Introduction; The Irish in Glasgow; Italians in Glasgow; Glasgow Jewry; Pakistanis in Glasgow; A history of Govanhill; Past and present; School-age education: a pragmatic approach; Youth services: the socialization model; Elderly care: a case of benevolent trial and error; Conclusion: the process of multiculturalism; Bibliography; Index.

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Reviews

’This detailed empirical study creatively exposes the complexity of social service provision within the framework of a commitment to an anti-racist politics and offers a forceful challenge to some current orthodoxies. It is essential reading for all those concerned with such matters, academics and practitioners alike.’ Professor Robert Miles, University of Glasgow, UK '...a valuable addition to the genre...a useful book which adds a valuable dimension to our knowledge of minority ethnic groups and how they manage to negotiate their way in a society such as Scotland, which has far more experience of emigration than immigration.' Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development