1st Edition

Narrating Death
The Limit of Literature





  • Available for pre-order. Item will ship after September 30, 2020
ISBN 9780367665012
September 30, 2020 Forthcoming by Routledge
212 Pages

USD $48.95

Prices & shipping based on shipping country


Preview

Book Description

Drawing on literary and visual texts spanning from the twelfth century to the present, this volume of essays explores what happens when narratives try to push the boundaries of what can be said about death.

Table of Contents



List of Contributors



Introduction



   DANIEL K. JERNIGAN, WALTER WADIAK, and W. MICHELLE WANG





PART I



The Uncrossable Border







1 Photography and First-Person Death: Derrida, Barthes, Poe



   KEVIN RIORDAN







2 "This memoryall men may have in mynd": Everyman and the Work of Mourning



   WALTER WADIAK







3 From Nothing to Never? Facing Death in King Lear



   MICHAEL NEILL







4 "Is there no danger in counterfeiting death?": Molière’s The Imaginary Invalid







   DANIEL K. JERNIGAN



PART II



Trajectories







5 "She is the God of Calvin, she sees the beginning and the end": Narrating Life and Death in the Fiction of Muriel Spark







   JOSEPH H. O’MEALY







6 Talking to the Dead: Narrative Closure and the Political Unconscious in Neil Jordan’s Fiction







   KEITH HOPPER







7 Samuel Johnson and the Grammar of Death





   LAURA DAVIES





8 Death and Romance in Sir Orfeo





   ELIZABETH ALLEN







PART III



Aesthetic Crossings







9 Death and the Maidens: John Banville’s Ekphrastic Storyworlds





   NEIL MURPHY



10 Blood Meridian, the Sublime, and Aesthetic Narrativizations of Death







   W. MICHELLE WANG





11 Murder Amidst the Chocolates: Martin McDonagh’s Multifaceted Uses of Death in In Bruges





   WILLIAM C. BOLES





12 The Ruined Voice in Tom Murphy’s Bailegangaire







   CHERYL JULIA LEE





Index

...
View More

Editor(s)

Biography

Daniel K. Jernigan is Associate Professor of English Literature at Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore. He has written extensively on Tom Stoppard, including his monograph, Tom Stoppard: Bucking the Postmodern (2013). He also edited Flann O’Brien: Plays and Teleplays (2013), and Aidan Higgins’s collection of radio plays, Darkling Plain: Texts for the Air (2010).





Walter Wadiak is Assistant Professor of English at Lafayette College. He specializes in Middle English literature and has written for Exemplaria, Philological Quarterly, and Glossator. His book, Savage Economy: The Returns of Middle English Romance (Notre Dame, 2016), examines the afterlives of chivalric culture in late-medieval English romances.



W. Michelle Wang is Assistant Professor at Nanyang Technological University’s School of Humanities, English. She received her Ph.D from The Ohio State University and was postdoctoral fellow at Queen Mary University of London, specializing in postmodern and contemporary fiction. She has published articles in the journals Narrative, Review of Contemporary Fiction, and Journal of Narrative Theory.