Natural Resource Sovereignty and the Right to Development in Africa  book cover
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Natural Resource Sovereignty and the Right to Development in Africa



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ISBN 9781032049069
August 26, 2021 Forthcoming by Routledge
312 Pages 4 B/W Illustrations

 
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Book Description

This book explores the nexus between natural resources ownership and the right to development in Africa.

The right to sovereignty over natural resources and the right to development are recognised and protected in an extensive framework of international, regional and domestic instruments. They guarantee people's entitlement to fully and freely utilise their natural resources as a means of subsistence and for economic, social and cultural development. Yet, despite the abundance of natural resources in Africa a majority of the people on the continent remain largely impoverished. This book articulates the central argument that to achieve the right to development in Africa requires appropriate governance of the continent’s natural resources to which the people of Africa are guaranteed sovereign ownership. With case study illustrations from Zimbabwe, Ghana, Ethiopia and the Democratic Republic of Congo, chapters explore the normative measures, specific guarantees and community entitlements to natural resources for the realization of the right to development.

The book will be an invaluable guide to scholars and postgraduate students of Natural Resources, Development and African studies as well as policymakers and practitioners in these areas.

Table of Contents

Introduction

1. The natural resource and right to development dilemma
Serges Djoyou Kamga and Carol Chi Ngang

Part 1: Normative Considerations on Natural Resource Sovereignty and the Right to Development

2. Sustainable right to development governance of natural resources in Africa
Carol Chi Ngang

3. Loss, anguish and postponement: The story of African development, natural resource ownership and the paradox of waiting
Isaac Shai

4. Rationale for Africa’s ‘legitimate’ ownership of her natural resources
Daphine Kabagambe Agaba

5. Resource constitutionalism for socio-economic development in Africa’s petrostates: Re-imagining prior-informed consent
Aaron Olaniyi Salau

6. Peoples’ right to natural resources in Africa and state sovereignty: A quest for equilibrium
Jacob Osutongun Abiodun

7. Colonial extraction of natural resource and the impact on the right to development in Africa
Annelie de Man and Carol Chi Ngang

Part 2: Permanent Sovereignty over Natural Resources

8. Issues of sovereignty over natural resources in Africa
Faith Kabata

9. Rethinking natural resource ownership and the realisation of the right to development for indigenous peoples in Africa
Esther E. Njieassam

10. Ownership of natural resources and the right to development for African indigenous peoples
Ebun Abolarin

11. Assessing the impact of water policies and practices on the RTD within the tourism industry in Africa
Furaha Joy Sekai Saungweme

Part 3: Collective Benefit-Sharing of Natural Resources in Sustaining the Right to Development

12. Sustainable Development Goals and the bumpy road to 2030 in Ethiopia: The challenges of land grabbing
Jean-Claude N. Ashukem

13. Freedom from want and the constitutional right to development in Ethiopia: Urban Productive Safety Net Programme–The case of Addis Ababa
Tsion T. Dechassa and Gedion G. Jalata

14. Corporate social responsibility and the right to development in local communities: The case of the Democratic Republic of Congo
Muyamba Mangu and Serges Djoyou Kamga

15. Laws on natural resources ownership in Ghana: A perceived hindrance to community development
Bridget Kafui Anthonio-Apedzi

16. Policy implications of the right to development through the Mining Charter of South Africa
Mofihli Teleki

17. Impact of artisanal and small scale gold mining on livelihood in Mutasa District of Manicaland Province, Zimbabwe
Cephas Mandihrawe

Conclusion

18. Towards a resilient development future in Africa
Carol Chi Ngang

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Editor(s)

Biography

Carol Chi Ngang is a Researcher at the Free State Centre for Human Rights, University of the Free State, South Africa and Senior Lecturer at the National University of Lesotho, and is also the editor of Insights into Policies and Practices on the Right to Development (2020)

Serges Djoyou Kamga is a Professor of Law at the Thabo Mbeki African School of Public and International Affairs, University of South Africa and is the author of The Right to Development in the African Human Rights System (Routledge, 2018)