Physics of Sailing: 1st Edition (Paperback) book cover

Physics of Sailing

1st Edition

By John Kimball

CRC Press

296 pages | 143 B/W Illus.

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Description

Breaking down the complicated concepts of speed, acceleration, torque, fluid mechanics, and surface physics, Physics of Sailing provides a lively, easily accessible introduction to the basic science underlying the sport of sailing. It illustrates the many ways physics can be used to understand the principles of sailboat propulsion and how a scientific understanding of the boat, wind, and water can lead to more skillful sailing.

After a brief but insightful tour of the history of sailing, the book explores the physics involved in making faster sailing crafts for both upwind and downwind sailing, including Newton’s impact theory of fluid resistance and lift and drag phenomena. It compares possible sail shapes, presents measurements of hull smoothness, and describes wind turbulence, the nature of water waves, and the structure of wakes. Using the physics of optics, the author also explains the connection between water’s appearance and the wind. Along with a glossary of sailing terms, he includes many examples throughout to illustrate the concepts in practice.

Avoiding unnecessary formalisms, this book skillfully applies the principles of fluid mechanics to sailboat technology and the art of sailing. It should help you become a more knowledgeable sailor.

Reviews

… a potpourri of good physics picking on the many areas in which basic and not so basic physics apply. … The chapter on fluid dynamics sets this book apart by its sceptical and pragmatic approach … Kimball puts each idea in its place showing where its strengths and weaknesses are. In doing so he provides a rare overview which so many books fail to give. … Chapters on wind generation and strategy conclude a fascinating read. … it is an intriguing gathering together of many disparate ideas which will keep the sailing scientist quiet in his bunk for many evenings. Also, it should be a standard introduction to any fluid dynamics course.

—R.S. Shorter, Contemporary Physics, 52, 2011

… an excellent introduction to the forces that enable sailboats to perform … . John Kimball has contributed a readable explanation of the physics behind sailing that will appeal to a wide range of technically oriented readers.

—James Harper, University of New Hampshire, Durham, USA

The book is very well written and informative.

—Guy Vandegrift, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio, USA

I like the book very much. It is well written and … fills a nice gap between my very introductory book and an even more detailed, mathematical approach.

—Bryon D. Anderson, Ph.D., Kent State University, Ohio, USA

Table of Contents

Depart, Depart from Solid Earth

Why Sailing, Why Physics, Why Both?

Origins

There’s Much More

Downwind—The Easy Direction

Speed

Forces

Boatspeed

Wind Shadow

Acceleration

Examples

The Speed Limit

Upwind—The Hard Direction

Overview

Iceboats

Sailboat Speeds

Why Is Sailing Upwind So Complicated?

Tipping, Torques, and Trouble

Roll, Pitch, and Yaw

Torques

Centers of Mass, Buoyancy, and Effort

Catamaran

Iceboat

Monohull

Staying Upright

Steering and Helm

Dynamics

Upright Mast

Personal Torques

See How the Mainsail Sets

Spinnaker

Mainsail and Jib

Real Sails

What Really Counts

Fluid Dynamics

Navier–Stokes Equation

Viscosity

Reynolds Number

Boundary Layers

Euler Equation

Why Are Fluids So Complicated?

Surfaces

An Example

Inadequate Theory

Curiosities

When Is It Smooth Enough?

Waves and Wakes

Wave Shape

Water Motion

Gravity Waves

Capillary Waves

Damping

Wind and Waves

Wave Packets and Group Velocity

An Example

Wakes

The Importance of Waves

Wind

Two Examples

Turbulence

Wind up High

Weather

Apologies

Strategy

Directions

Constant Preferred Direction

Variable Preferred Direction

Current

Least-Time Path

Light Analogy

Mathematical Approach

Predicting the Wind

Real Sailing

Finally

Sailing Glossary

Index

About the Author

John Kimball is a professor of physics at the University of Albany.

Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
SCI055000
SCIENCE / Physics