Princes of the Church: Bishops and their Palaces, 1st Edition (Hardback) book cover

Princes of the Church

Bishops and their Palaces, 1st Edition

Edited by David Rollason

Routledge

460 pages

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Description

Princes of the Church brings together the latest research exploring the importance of bishops’ palaces for social and political history, landscape history, architectural history and archaeology. It is the first book-length study of such sites since Michael Thompson’s Medieval Bishops’ Houses (1998), and the first work ever to adopt such a wide-ranging approach to them in terms of themes and geographical and chronological range.

Including contributions from the late Antique period through to the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, it deals with bishops’ residences in England, Scotland, Wales, the Byzantine Empire, France, and Italy. It is structured in three sections: design and function, which considers how bishops’ palaces and houses differed from the palaces and houses of secular magnates, in their layout, design, furnishings, and functions; landscape and urban context, which considers the relationship between bishops’ palaces and houses and their political and cultural context, the landscapes and towns or cities in which they were set, and the parks, forests, and towns that were planned and designed around them; and architectural form, which considers the extent of shared features between bishops’ palaces and houses, and their relationship to the houses of other Church potentates and to the houses of secular magnates.

Table of Contents

List of figures

List of plates

Preface

Chapter 1 Introduction: Researching the Palaces of Princes of the Church , David Rollason

PART I: PROJECTING IMAGES OF POWER

Chapter 2 Thomas Wolsey as the Ideal Cardinal and his Palace of Hampton Court, Margaret Harvey

Chapter 3 Late Antique Episcopal Complexes: Bishop Eufrasius and his Residence at Poreč (Croatia), Jaqueline P. Sturm

Chapter 4 The Political and Cultural Significance of the Bishop's Palace in Medieval Italy, Maureen C. Miller

Chapter 5 ‘A Mere Domestic Life’: Catherine Talbot in the Georgian Episcopal Home, Michael Ashby

Chapter 6 Auckland Castle in the Late Eighteenth and Early Nineteenth Centuries: the Palace and Princely Power, Ria Snowdon

Chapter 7 Bishops’ Residences, Saints’ Cults, and the Legacy of Sacred Authority in the Medieval Dioceses of St Andrews and Glasgow, Penelope Dransart

PART II: PALACES, FORESTS, AND PARKS

Chapter 8 Pre-Conquest Regalian Roots of Episcopal Forests and Chases, Graham Jones

Chapter 9 English bishops’ Hunting Rights, Hunts, and Hunting Grounds, John Langton

Chapter 10 Deer Parks and Masculine Egos: Knights, Priors, and Bishops in the Medieval North of England, Andrew G. Miller

Chapter 11 The Bishop of Durham's Park at Auckland Castle in the Middle Ages, J. Linda Drury

PART III: PALACES AND THE WORK OF THE BISHOP

Chapter 12 English Bishops’ Itineraries, c. 700-c. 1200, Julia Barrow

Chapter 13 How to Travel with a Bishop: Thirteenth-Century Episcopal Itineraries, Philippa M. Hoskin

Chapter 14 Bishops’ houses in medieval London, John Schofield

Chapter 15 Why so Many Houses? The Varied Functions of the Episcopal Residences of the See of Winchester, c.1130-c.1680 439, John Hare

Chapter 16 Evidence Regarding Bishops’ Use of Hall and Chamber in Later Thirteenth-Century England, with Observations Regarding Notarial Influence, Michael Burger

Chapter 17 The Gatehouse and Precincts of the Bishop’s Palace at Exeter, Richard Parker

PART IV: DESIGN, FUNCTION, AND DECORATION

Chapter 18 Ubi papa ibi Roma: the Bishop of Rome’s Residence in the Fourteenth Century: Avignon, Gottfried Kerscher

Chapter 19 Exeter Bishop’s Palace, Stuart Blaylock

Chapter 20 En Route and in Residence: Integrating Documentary and Archaeological Evidence for the Itineraries and Residences of the Medieval Bishops of Durham, Caroline Smith and C. Pamela Graves, with Matt Claydon, and Mark Randerson

Chapter 21 Auckland and Durham Castles in the Eighteenth Century, Richard Pears

Chapter 22 Bishop Hurd’s Library at Hartlebury Castle, Christine Penney

Chapter 23 Auckland and Durham Castles in John Cosin’s Time, Adrian Green

Chapter 24 Bishop Hugh of Le Puiset’s Great Hall at Auckland Castle: Its Place in English Twelfth-Century Architecture, Malcolm Thurlby

Chapter 25 St Davids Bishop’s Palace and its Remarkable Roofscape, Rick Turner

References

I. Original Sources and Abbreviations

II. Secondary Sources

Index

About the Editor

David Rollason studied for his first degree at Balliol College, Oxford, where he sat at the feet particularly of J. M. Wallace-Hadrill, Peter Brown, and Henry Mayr-Harting; then for his PhD at the University of Birmingham, under the supervision of Wendy Davies and R. H. C. Davis, and – informally – of Philip Rahtz. After a year at the Coll?ge de France, supervised by Georges Duby, he was appointed lecturer in history at the University of Durham in 1977. He retired in 2010 and remains Emeritus Professor, his most recent publication being The Power of Place: Rulers and Their Palaces, Landscapes, Cities, and Holy Places (2016) – the outcome of his 2010-13 Leverhulme Trust Major Research Fellowship.

About the Series

Society for Medieval Archaeology Monographs

The Society has published a series of monographs for more than 50 years. Our list includes synthetic edited volumes on specific themes such as the archaeology of the 11th century and maritime societies of the Viking and medieval world. We also publish excavation monographs on all medieval site types from cemeteries and burials, rural settlement, towns, industry, religious and monastic sites, to manors and moat. Accounts of some of medieval archaeology's most iconic excavations can be found here.

All the publications are fully refereed with the aim of publishing at the highest academic level reports on sites of national and international importance, and of encouraging the widest debate. The series’ objectives are to cover the broadest chronological and geographical range and to assemble a series of volumes which reflect the changing intellectual and technical scope of the discipline.

 

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Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
SOC003000
SOCIAL SCIENCE / Archaeology