Raising Cane : The Political Economy Of Sugar In Western India book cover
SAVE
$6.59
1st Edition

Raising Cane
The Political Economy Of Sugar In Western India





ISBN 9780367300432
Published May 31, 2021 by Routledge
366 Pages

 
SAVE ~ $6.59
was $32.95
USD $26.36

Prices & shipping based on shipping country


Preview

Book Description

In Maharashtra state, nearly one hundred sugar factories are owned and operated by peasants. Large in scale and efficient in operation, these factories are organized as cooperatives, with half a million cane growers as their voting members. In many cases, the co-ops have out-competed factories owned by industrial capitalists. This book describes th

Table of Contents

Introduction -- The Problem -- The Setting -- Sugar Production Before Independence -- Irrigation and Imperialism -- Peasants Versus Capitalists -- Malegaon Village, 1900-1950 -- Old Elites and New Entrepreneurs -- Migration and Economic Mobility -- The Pattern of Inequality and Mobility -- Cooperative Sugar, 1950–1985 -- The Politics of Sugar -- Performance and Impact of a Sugar Co-op -- Why Do Some Cooperatives Work? -- Conclusion -- Revolution from the Middle -- Appendix on Methods

...
View More

Author(s)

Biography

Donald W. Attwood first visited India in 1966, a time of agricultural crisis and general pessimism concerning the country's future. After a quarter-century of observation (including five years living in India and Nepal), he is impressed by changes that have occurred since the 1960s. In 1969 he began studying the cooperative sugar factories in western India, and he has continued working on this subject ever since. Author of numerous articles and co-editor of several books, Attwood is now completing a two-volume report on cooperatives and rural development in India—the result of a team research project organized with B. S. Baviskar, his Indian mentor and colleague. He has also started research on enterprising peasants and local organizations in Costa Rica. Educated at the University of California-Berkeley, the University of Chicago, and McGill University in Montreal, where he is now an associate professor of anthropology, Attwood received his first lessons in irrigation, cooperation, and much else at Deep Springs College in California.