Recognition, Conflict and the Problem of Global Ethical Community: 1st Edition (Paperback) book cover

Recognition, Conflict and the Problem of Global Ethical Community

1st Edition

Edited by Shannon Brincat

Routledge

142 pages

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Description

Recognition has become a central thematic in contemporary political, social, and international relations theory. Its fundamentality to social life is apparent in that how we recognise others and are recognized by them is essential to both the identity of individual subjects and the relations between self and other in ethical community. As such, recognition is properly basic to all social interactions; between individuals, groups, local communities and sovereign states. Without the foundational act of recognition, relations can become unequal and antagonistic, leading to social pathologies, denigration and even open conflict.

This volume brings together leading scholars of recognition theory in international relations, sociology and politics, to discuss the potential for recognition to understand the problem of conflict and the possibilities in developing global ethical community.

This book was published as a special issue of Global Discourse.

Table of Contents

1. Introduction: Recognition, conflict and the problem of ethical community Shannon Brincat

2. Shame and recognition: the politics of disclosure and acknowledgement Julie Connolly

3. Reply: Shame and recognition: the politics of disclosure and acknowledgement: a reply to Julie Connolly Tony Castleman

4. Al-Muhajiroun in the United Kingdom: the role of international non-recognition in heightened radicalization dynamics Maéva Clément

5. Reply: Terrorism, discourse and analysis thereof: a reply to Clément Lee Jarvis

6. Recognition and the origins of international society Erik Ringmar

7. Reply: Recognition and the origins of international society: a reply to Erik Ringmar John M. Hobson

8. Treating Asian nations with respect: promises and pitfalls of status recognition Reinhard Wolf

9. Reply: Treating Asian nations with respect: promises and pitfalls of status recognition: a reply to Reinhard Wolf Michael Clarke

10. Interest, passion, (non)recognition, and wars: a conceptual essay Thomas Lindemann

11.Reply: Recognizing non-recognition: a reply to Lindemann Brent J. Steele

12. (Dis-)respect and (non-)recognition in world politics: the Anglo-Boer war and German policy at the turn of the nineteenth/twentieth century Lena Jaschob

13. Reply: (Dis-)respect and (non-)recognition in world politics: the Anglo-Boer War and German policy at the turn of the nineteenth/twentieth century: a reply to Lena Jaschob Bill Nasson

14. Killing without hatred: the politics of (non)-recognition in contemporary Western wars Mathias Delori

15. Reply: Killing without hatred: the politics of (non)-recognition in contemporary Western wars: a reply to Mathias Delori Kamil Shah

About the Editor

Shannon Brincat is a Griffith University Research Fellow based in the School of Government and International Relations. He has been the editor of a number of collections, most recently the Special Issue of Globalizations ‘Dialectics and World Politics’ and the three volume series Communism in the 21st Century (Praeger, 2014). He is also to co-founder and co-editor of the journal Global Discourse. His current research focuses on recognition theory and cosmopolitanism; dialectics; tyrannicide; climate change justice; and Critical Theory. He has articles published in the European Journal of International Relations, Review of International Studies and Constellations, amongst others.

Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
POL000000
POLITICAL SCIENCE / General