Routledge Socio-Legal Frontiers of Transitional Justice

Edited by

This series addresses the future potential, developments and success of transitional justice and its multi-faceted approaches. To this end, it focuses on the socio-legal aspects of transitional justice in the widest sense.

It does this in three focal areas where important future developments have been identified. First, it addresses the decisive changes in the landscape of conflict and post-conflict situations in which contemporary transitional justice mechanisms operate, offering a wide range of socio-legal analyses of these mechanisms, their drivers and backgrounds, modes of operation, legal foundations and models of justice. A second focus is on the law and legal systems in conflict situations, transition and post-conflict situations, and on the functioning of law and legal systems under the extreme conditions of conflict-affected societies during and post conflict. Finally, the series addresses those justice mechanisms that provide recognition and redress for past crimes by states and institutions, even if these do not originate from conflict and transitional periods.

Themes that the series engages with include individual-level reactions by those involved; outreach strategies, legitimacy and justification; horizontal and vertical diffusion of norms and institutions; impact of legal education and training; the role of corporations; and transitional justice in multicultural legal settings. Additionally, it examines legal transplants, global lawmaking and its impact on violence and other crimes, including non-state crimes such as organized crime actors, and transnational corporations.

The focus of this series is on the range of transitional justice mechanisms and tools, as legal mechanisms in their widest sense. In this regard, the editors wish to promote a legal realist approach, which will necessarily privilege robust empirical studies with a diversity of methods.